Metamorphoses (Norton Critical Editions)

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W. W. Norton & Company, 2010 - Literary Criticism - 551 pages
2 Reviews

In his award-winning translation, Charles Martin combines fidelity to Ovid’s text with verse that catches the speed and liveliness of the original.

Ovid’s epic poem—whose theme of change has resonated throughout the ages—is one of the most important texts of Western imagination, an inspiration from Dante’s time to the present, when writers such as Salman Rushdie and Italo Calvino have found a living source in Ovid’s work. The text is accompanied by a preface, A Note on the Translation, and detailed explanatory annotations.

“Sources and Backgrounds” includes Seneca’s inspired commentary on Ovid, Charles Martin’s essay on the ways in which pantomimic dancing—an art form popular in Ovid’s time—may have been the model for Metamorphoses, as well as related works by Virgil, Callimachus, Hesiod, and Lucretius, among others.

From the enormous body of scholarly writing on Metamorphoses, Charles Martin has chosen six major interpretations by Bernard Knox, J. R. R. Mackail, Norman O. Brown, Italo Calvino, Frederick Ahl, and Diane Middlebrook.

A Glossary of Persons, Places, and Personifications in the Metamorphoses and a Chronology and Selected Bibliography are also included.

 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - BayardUS - LibraryThing

I've recently read several interesting short story collections from antiquity, namely The Canterbury Tales, Arabian Nights, and Ovid's Metamorphoses. Each of them has inspired enough academic articles ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - VivalaErin - LibraryThing

Charles Martin's translation is very good. He was able to stick to the Latin poetic form. And I love all the extra context and essays available from a Norton Critical. Excellent work. Read full review

Contents

B O O
13
BOOT
49
B O O I
89
B O O I IV
121
BOOK V
166
BOOK VI
190
OF THE TIES THAT BIND
221
IMPIOUS ACTS AND EXEMPLARY LIVES
261
THE SONGS OF ORPHEUS
339
ROME BEGINS AT TROY
367
AROUND AND ABOUT THE ILIAD
405
SPOILS OF WAR AND PANGs OF LOVE
435
AROUND AND ABOUT WITH AENEAS
479
PROPHETIC ACTS AND VISIONARY DREAMS
519
Notes
555
Persons Places and Personyications in the Metamorphoses
577

DESIRE DECEIT AND DIFFICULT DELIVERIES
301

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About the author (2010)

Publius Ovidius Naso (20 March 43 BC--AD 17/18), known as Ovid. Born of an equestrian family in Sulmo, Ovid was educated in rhetoric in Rome but gave it up for poetry. He counted Horace and Propertius among his friends and wrote an elegy on the death of Tibullus. He became the leading poet of Rome but was banished in 8 A.D. by an edict of Augustus to remote Tomis on the Black Sea because of a poem and an indiscretion. Miserable in provincial exile, he died there ten years later. His brilliant, witty, fertile elegiac poems include Amores (Loves), Heroides (Heroines), and Ars Amatoris (The Art of Love), but he is perhaps best known for the Metamorphoses, a marvelously imaginative compendium of Greek mythology where every story alludes to a change in shape. Ovid was admired and imitated throughout the Middle Ages and Renaissance. Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare, and Jonson knew his works well. His mastery of form, gift for narration, and amusing urbanity are irresistible.

Charles Martin is a poet, critic, and translator. He lives in Syracuse, New York.

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