Metamorphoses

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Hackett Publishing, Sep 1, 2010 - Poetry - 538 pages
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Ovid's Metamorphoses gains its ideal twenty-first-century herald in Stanley Lombardo's bracing translation of a wellspring of Western art and literature that is too often treated, even by poets, as a mere vehicle for the scores of myths it recasts and transmits rather than as a unified work of art with epic-scale ambitions of its own. Such misconceptions are unlikely to survive a reading of Lombardo's rendering, which vividly mirrors the brutality, sadness, comedy, irony, tenderness, and eeriness of Ovid's vast world as well as the poem's effortless pacing. Under Lombardo's spell, neither Argus nor anyone else need fear nodding off. The translation is accompanied by an exhilarating Introduction by W. R. Johnson that unweaves and reweaves many of the poem's most important themes while showing how the poet achieves some of his most brilliant effects. An analytical table of contents, a catalog of transformations, and a glossary are also included.

 

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Metamorphoses
Ovid, Stanley Lombardo, W. R. (INT) Johnson - Literary Criticism - 2010 - 492 pages
"Stanley Lombardo successfully matches Ovid's human drama, imaginative brio, and irresistible
momentum; and Ralph Johnson's superb Introduction to Ovid's `narratological paradise' is a bonus to this new and vigorous translation that should not be missed. Together, Introduction and text bring out the delightful unpredictability of Ovid's `history of the world' down to his times."---Elaine Fantham, Giger Professor of Latin, Emerita, Princeton University Mercury was poised to tell the whole story, When he saw that all of the eyes had closed. He Stopped speaking and deepened Argus' slumber, By waving his wand over those languid orbs. And then he brought his sickled sword down, On that nodding head where it joined the neck, And sent it spattering down the steep rocks. Now you lie low, Argus, and all your lights are out, Those hundred eyes mastered by one dark night. (1.766-74) Ovid's Metamorphoses gains its ideal twenty-first-century herald in Stanley Lombardo's bracing translation of a wellspring of Western art and literature that is too often treated, even by poets, as a mere vehicle for the scores of myths it recasts and transmits rather than as a unified work of art with epicscale ambitions of its own. Such misconceptions are unlikely to survive a reading of Lombardo's rendering, which vividly mirrors the brutality, sadness, comedy, irony, tenderness, and eeriness of Ovid's vast world as well as the poem's effortless pacing. Under Lombardo's spell, neither Argus nor anyone else need fear nodding off. The translation is accompanied by an exhilarating Introduction by W. R. Johnson that unweaves and reweaves many of the poem's most important themes while showing how the poet achieves some of his most brilliant effects.
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About the author (2010)

Stanley Lombardo is Professor of Classics, University of Kansas. W. R. Johnson is Professor of Classics and Comparative Literature, Emeritus, University of Chicago.

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