Meter in English: A Critical Engagement

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David Baker
University of Arkansas Press, Jan 1, 1996 - Poetry - 368 pages
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Renowned poets and experts in metrics respond to Robert Wallace's pivotal essay, Meter in English, which clarifies and simplifies methods of studying poetry.
 

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Meter in English: a critical engagement

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

In 1993, the poet Robert Wallace sent editor Baker and others an essay (included here) called "Meter in English," which seeks to clarify its subject through a series of propositions, the main being ... Read full review

Meter in English: a critical engagement

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

In 1993, the poet Robert Wallace sent editor Baker and others an essay (included here) called "Meter in English," which seeks to clarify its subject through a series of propositions, the main being ... Read full review

Contents

METER IN ENGLISH
3
PART TWO
43
A RESPONSE
45
A DEFENSE OF THE NONIAMBIC METERS
59
METERMAKING ARGUMENTS
75
A RESPONSE TO ROBERT WALLACE
97
SOME RESPONSES TO ROBERT WALLACE
109
A NEW FOOTING
125
VERSE VS PROSEPROSODY VS METER
249
METRICS AND PEDAGOGICAL ECONOMY
265
TWO LETTERS
279
A RESPONSE TO ROBERT WALLACE
283
PART THREE
293
COMPLETING THE CIRCLE
295
BIBLIOGRAPHY
351
CONTRIBUTORS
357

METRICAL PLEASURES OF OUR TIME
151
STRENGTH IN DIVERSITY
169
METER AND THE FORTUNES OF THE NUMERICAL IMAGINATION
197
STAUNCH METER GREAT SONG
221

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Page v - The sound must seem an echo to the sense : Soft is the strain when Zephyr gently blows, And the smooth stream in smoother numbers flows ; But when loud surges lash the sounding shore, The hoarse, rough verse should like the torrent roar : When Ajax strives some rock's vast weight to throw, The line too labours, and the words move slow ; Not so, when swift Camilla scours the plain, Flies o'er th' unbending corn, and skims along the main.

About the author (1996)

David Baker is author or editor of fourteen books of poetry and criticism. He holds the Thomas B. Fordham Chair at Denison University, teaches regularly in the Warren Wilson College MFA program, and is the poetry editor of the Kenyon Review.

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