Method in Madness: Case Studies in Cognitive Neuropsychiatry

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Peter W. Halligan, John C. Marshall
Psychology Press, 1996 - Psychology - 310 pages
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In clinical neuropsychiatry, case studies provide invaluable demonstrations of the range and types of unusual psychological states that can occur after brain damage. In the pursuit of objectivity and scientific respectability, however, many academic reports of neuropsychiatric disorders appear cold, contrived and impersonal. The essence and character of the patient's experience and behaviour is easily obscured or even lost - a fact that cannot help researchers, therapists and other practitioners to relate their conceptual knowledge to the flesh-and-blood people they meet in their professional lives. In practice, much of the actual discourse of such patients has been ignored as unworthy of scientific interest. This book describes real patients in a clear and jargon-free way. These cases should serve to reduce the discrepancy between the formal representations of psychiatric illness in the mainstream literature and the reality of people struggling to make sense of their own predicament in everyday life.
 

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Contents

Towards a Cognitive Neuropsychiatry
3
Reduplicative Misidentification Syndromes
13
Section B WHO ARE YOU?
37
Delusional Paramnesic Misidentification
51
A Study of an Adult with Asperger Syndrome
79
WHO AM I?
93
Multiple Personality and Schizophrenia
123
Case Studies of the Cotard Delusion
147
The Alien Hand
173
WHERE WAS I?
185
No Past New Life
209
Section E WHAT DO I BELIEVE?
235
False Perceptions or False Beliefs? Hallucinations and Delusions
267
Author Index
293
Subject Index
303
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About the author (1996)

Peter Halligan PhD, DSc, FBPsS, FPSI, FMedSci is Professor and Dean of Strategic Futures and Interdisciplinary Studies, Department of Psychology, University of Cardiff, UK.

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