Methods of Research in Microscopical Anatomy and Embryology

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S.E. Cassino, 1885 - Embryology - 255 pages
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Page 111 - Schiefferdecker, the imbedding fluid consists of a concentrated solution of celloidin in a mixture of equal parts of absolute alcohol and ether. The specimen is soaked successively in absolute alcohol and ether, and in the imbedding fluid. This requires at least several days. After this time, the imbedding proper may be undertaken, and for this we have the choice of two methods. The even surface of a cork is covered with a thick solution . of celloidin, so as to form by evaporation a strong collodion...
Page 16 - Although Dr. Mayer seldom uses this medium where histological details are required, he observes that in those classes of animals whose bodies are easily penetrated with watery fluids, osmic acid is seldom to be dispensed with. Bleaching. — It often happens that objects treated with osmic acid continue to blacken, after removal from the acid, until they are entirely worthless, and such results are even more annoying than the difficulties in the way of staining. It has been said that the blackening...
Page 12 - ... (4) This crust also prevents the action of staining fluids, except aqueous solutions, by which it would be dissolved. Notwithstanding these drawbacks alcohol is still regarded at the Naples Aquarium as an excellent fluid for killing many animals designed for preservation in museums or for histological work. In many cases the unsatisfactory results obtained are to be attributed not to the alcohol per se, but to the method of using it. Most of the foregoing objections do not, as Dr. Mayer has expressly...
Page 36 - Schaller's mode of preparation gives purer carminic acid than De la Rue's, but either kind is sufficiently pure for histological purposes. The precipitation by lead acetate and the dissolving in alcohol free the carminic acid from animal impurities, and the consequence is a purer form of pigment than can be extracted by any process hitherto employed for the preparation of carmin for histolcgical purposes.
Page 236 - July, 1882, page 785, it was said to be sparingly soluble in cold, strong alcohol, and completely in hot, but to separate out on cooling. After trying various substances — wax, paraffine oil, and glycerine — with but partial success, the use of vaseline was suggested by the two authors independently and nearly at the same time. The experiments tried last spring indicated that during three months, at ordinary spring and summer temperatures, there was no appreciable loss of ninety-five per cent.
Page 83 - It should set into a stiff mass when cold ; how stiff will best be learned by experience. The tissue to be cut is transferred from water to the melted jelly, and should remain in it till well permeated. It is then placed on the piston of a Rutherford's microtome ; the " well " should not be filled ; for adherence, it is sufficient to roughen the surface of the piston with a file. No more jelly should be used than is sufficient to surround the specimen ; if too much has been added it may be removed,...
Page 237 - ... expected to accomplish. Kleinenberg's picro-sulphuric acid, for instance, now so much used in the Naples Aquarium, is not a hardening fluid. It serves for killing, and thus prepares for subsequent hardening.
Page 43 - ... a mixture of powdered carmine (2 g.) with water (25 ccm.), while heating over a water bath, add sufficient ammonia to dissolve the carmine. The solution may then be left open for a few weeks (Mayer), in order that the ammonia may evaporate ; or the evaporation may be accelerated by heating (Hoyer). So long as any ammonia remains, large bubbles will form while boiling, but as soon as the free ammonia has been expelled, the bubbles will be small and the colour of the fluid begin to be a little...
Page 33 - ... the use of aqueous media, both in mounting and staining. The disadvantages often arising from the use of these media in staining alcoholic preparations, such as the tearing asunder of fragile tissues caused by the violent osmosis; swelling, the effects of which cannot always be fully obliterated by again transferring to alcohol, and maceration, which is liable to result where objects are left for a considerable time in the staining liquid, may all be avoided by using alcoholic solutions. Objects...
Page 119 - The balsam (a mixture of balsam and xylol in equal parts) is placed onJbe cover-glass, and this allowed to sink slowly, from one side, over the sections. Dr. Gaule finds it convenient, especially with serial sections, to use large coverglasses — often nearly as large as the slide itself. Thus a single slide may often contain a large number of sections closely arranged under one cover. For large sections this method offers one important advantage over that of Dr. Giesbrecht; for by the former all...

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