Methods of Tree-planting

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University of Nebraska, Agricultural Experiment Station of Nebraska, 1898 - Tree planting - 14 pages
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Page 22 - Davis, iall planted, top growth 14 inches, root growth 8 inches ; spring planted, top growth 12 inches, root growth 5 inches, both having numerous fibrous roots. Shackelford, fall planted, top growth 17 inches, root growth 5 inches ; spring planted, top growth 7 inches, root growth 9 inches, young roots scattering and not as numerous as Ben Davis. Winesap, fall planted, top growth 12 inches, root growth 8 inches ; spring planted, top growth 7 inches, root growth 6 inches, young roots very scattering....
Page 22 - November 3, 1897, four trees of each of the following varieties of apples were received from a St. Louis nursery: Ben Davis, Winesap, Oldenberg, Chenango and Shackelford, also three trees of each of the following varieties of peaches: Crosby, Crawford's Early, Reeves' favorite, Globe and Elberta. The plants had been taken up from the nursery without mutilating the excellent root system which they possessed. The side branches of the apple trees were cut back about one half and the peaches to one or...
Page 22 - Reeves' favorite, Globe and Elberta. The plants had been taken up from the nursery without mutilating the excellent root system which they possessed. The side branches of the apple trees were cut back about one half and the peaches to one or two buds. In this condition they were planted, soon after having been received. "December 14 ten of the apple trees and seven of the peach trees were dug. Of the apple trees none of the roots had formed a callous on the cut surface, but seven of them had made...
Page 21 - ... very small, not over one eighth to one fourth of an inch in length. None were found on the peach trees. The trees had been planted in well cultivated garden land, tree from weeds, and good rains had fallen, so that the soil conditions were excellent, much better than they usually would be in Nebraska.
Page 22 - April 9, 1898, one tree each of Ben Davis and Shackleford and two trees each of Winesap and Oldenberg were planted adjoining those left standing in the fall. July 2, all were dug and the following notes taken: Ben Davis, fall planted, top growth 14 inches, root growth 8 inches; spring planted, top growth 12 inches, root growth 5 inches, both having numerous fibrous roots. Shackelford, fall planted, top growth 17 inches, root growth 5 inches ; spring planted, top growth 7 inches, root .growth 9 inches,...
Page 21 - October 22 weie taken up and examined. Root growth was progressing well in most cases, and callousing was also under way. The amount of growth was not large, but sufficient to fully demonstrate the fact that trees can make a growth of roots when the tops are dormant. At that date the buds had not begun to swell and the trees were apparently as completely dormant as during the winter. In general the apple trees appeared to be making more root growth than the peach trees. There had apparently been...
Page 22 - ... more root growth than the peach trees. There had apparently been no callousing during the fall and winter. there being little indication of it in most cases even at that time. Where apparent, it seemed to be just beginning at the cambium ring. Through the kindness of Dr. William Trelease, the Missouri Botanical Garden co-operated with us in seeking light upon this question. The experiments were in charge of HC Irish, the Horticultural assistant, who makes the following report: "November 3, 1897,...
Page 10 - F. KENOWER Wisner THE STATION OFFICERS GEO. E. MACLEAN PH. D. LL. D. Director J. STUART DALES M. PH. Treasurer WM. W. MARSHALL Executive Clerk THE WORKING STAFF HUDSON H. NICHOLSON MA Chemist CHARLES E. BESSEY PH. D. Botanist LAWRENCE BRUNER B.
Page 24 - On the method of digging large holes through the compact subsoil and filling these with mellow surface soil in which to plant the trees, no conclusions could as yet be drawn from the experiments. Several methods of root pruning were tried, which varied from cutting the roots back to only 1 or 2 in.
Page 21 - ... roots when the tops are dormant. At that date the buds had not begun to swell and the trees were apparently as completely dormant as during the winter. In general the apple trees appeared to be making more root growth than the peach trees. There had apparently been no callousing during the fall and winter. there being little indication of it in most cases even at that time. Where apparent, it seemed to be just beginning at the cambium ring. Through the kindness of Dr. William Trelease, the Missouri...

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