Mexican And American Responses To The International Narcotics Threat: Hearing Before The Committee On Foreign Relations, U.s. Senate

Front Cover
Jesse Helms
DIANE Publishing, 1999 - 142 pages
Presents testimony and statements in response to and support of the position that Mexico has made insufficient progress in establishing an effective counternarcotics program. Includes statements from Committee members as well as representatives from the California Narcotics Officers Assoc., the DEA, the Dept,. of State, the Office of Nat. Drug Control Policy, the Nat. Narcotic Officers' Assoc. Coalition, the Dept. of the Treasury, and the Washington Office on Latin America. Exhibits include correspondence between Pres. Clinton and Senate members, relevant legislation, and a selection of newspaper articles and editorials.
 

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Page 114 - IN THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES JANUARY 3, 1985 Mr. MATTINGLY (for himself, Mr. EVANS, Mr. THURMOND, and Mr. ARMSTRONG) introduced the following joint resolution; which was read twice and referred to the Committee on the Judiciary JOINT RESOLUTION Proposing an amendment to the Constitution of the United States to allow the President to veto items of appropriation. 1 Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives...
Page 131 - States, or taken adequate steps on their own, to achieve full compliance with the goals and objectives of the 1988 United Nations Convention Against Illicit Traffic in...
Page 131 - ... cooperated fully with the United States, or has taken adequate steps on its own, to achieve full compliance with the goals and objectives established by the United Nations Convention Against Illicit Traffic in Narcotic Drugs and Psychotropic Substances...
Page 131 - Section 490 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as amended, requires the President to submit to Congress by March 1 each year a list of major illicit drug producing and transiting countries that he has certified as fully cooperative and therefore eligible to continue to receive US foreign aid and other economic and trade benefits.
Page 60 - They employed 727 aircraft to ferry drugs to Mexico, from where they were smuggled into the United States, and then return to Colombia with the money from US drug sales. Using landing areas in Mexico, they were able to evade US law enforcement officials and make important alliances with transportation and distribution experts in Mexico. With intense law enforcement pressure focused on the Cali leadership by...
Page 60 - Mexican groups' capebilities to transport Colombian-produced cocaine into the United States. This huge shipment was driven across the Mexican/US border in small shipments and stored in ;he warehouse until all transportation fees had been paid by the Cali and Medellin cartels, to the transporters from Mexico. Now, trafficking groups from Mexico are routinely paid in multi-ton quantities of cocaine, making them formidable cocaine traffickers in their own right. The majority of cocaine entering the...
Page 60 - Cali leadership by brave men and women in the Colombian National Police during 1995 and 1996, all of the top leadership of the Cali syndicate are either in jail, or dead. The fine work done by General Serrano...
Page 60 - Orejuela and his associates composed what was, until then, the most powerful international organized crime group in history. They employed...
Page 60 - Mexico have learned important lessons from them, becoming major trafficking organizations in their own right. During the late 1980's the Call group assumed greater and greater power as their predecessors from the Medellin cartel self-destructed. Where the Medellin cartel was brash and publicly violent in their activities, the criminals, who ran their organization from Cali, labored behind the pretense of legitimacy, posing as businessmen, just carrying out their professional obligations. The Cali...
Page 23 - I want to thank the chairman and members of the committee for the opportunity of presenting this statement.

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