Michelangelo, Drawing, and the Invention of Architecture

Front Cover
Yale University Press, 2008 - Architecture - 259 pages
0 Reviews

In this engaging and handsome book, Cammy Brothers takes an unusual approach to Michelangelo's architectural designs, arguing that they are best understood in terms of his experience as a painter and sculptor. Unlike previous studies, which have focused on the built projects and considered the drawings only insofar as they illuminate those buildings, this book analyses his designs as an independent source of insight into the mechanisms of Michelangelo's imagination. Brothers gives equal weight to the unbuilt designs, and suggests that some of Michelangelo's most radical ideas remained on paper.

Brothers explores the idea of drawing as a mode of thinking, using its evidence to reconstruct the process by which Michelangelo arrived at new ideas. By turning the flexibility and fluidity of his figurative drawing methods to the subject of architecture, Michelangelo demonstrated how it could match the expressive possibilities of painting and sculpture.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

Michelangelo, drawing, and the invention of architecture

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

As the definitive mannerist architect, Michelangelo challenged conventions of form, space, order, and scale. Brothers (architecture, Univ. of Virginia) presents the possibility that Michelangelo may ... Read full review

Contents

ARCHITECTURE EDUCATION AND THE ANTIQUE
45
THE FIGURE AND THE FRAME
85
ARCHITECTURE AS SUBJECT
153
Copyright

3 other sections not shown

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2008)

Cammy Brothers is associate professor of architecture at the University of Virginia.

Bibliographic information