Microcognition: Philosophy, Cognitive Science, and Parallel Distributed Processing

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MIT Press, 1989 - Psychology - 226 pages

Parallel distributed processing is transforming the field of cognitive science. Microcognition provides a clear, readable guide to this emerging paradigm from a cognitive philosopher's point of view. It explains and explores the biological basis of PDP, its psychological importance, and its philosophical relevance.

 

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Contents

Introduction What the BrainsEye View Tells the MindsEye View
1
Parallel Distributed Processing and Conventional Al
2
The MindsEye View and the BrainsEye View
3
The Fate of the Folk
5
Threads to Follow
6
PART
7
Chapter
9
The PhysicalSymbolSystem Hypothesis
11
Biology Revisited
104
Chapter 6
107
Symbolic Flexibility
111
Grades of Semantic Transparency
114
Underpinning Symbolic Flexibility
118
PDP and the Nature of Intelligence
121
an Equivalence Class of Algorithms
124
Chapter 7
127

Bringing Home the BACON
13
Semantically Transparent Systems
17
Functionalism
21
Chapter 2
25
It Aint What You Know Its the Way You Know It
27
Manipulating the Formal Shadows of Mind
30
Showing What Were Made Of
32
Microfunctionalism
34
Chapter 3
37
A Beginners Guide to Folk Psychology
38
The Trouble with Folk
39
Content and World
42
Interlude
46
Some Naturalistic Reflections
47
Ascriptive Meaning Holism
48
Churchland Again
50
Cognitive Science and Constitutive Claims
54
Functionalism without Folk
58
Chapter 4
61
Thrift the 007 Principle
63
Gradualistic Holism and the Historical Snowball
66
The Methodology of MIND
74
PART 2
75
The BrainsEye View
81
Chapter 5
83
The Space between the Notes
84
The Jets and the Sharks
86
Emergent Schemata
92
Distributed Memory
96
Against Uniformity
128
Simulating a Von Neumann Architecture
131
A Lacuna in the Account of Real Symbol Processing
136
Full Simulation Intuitive Processing and the Conscious Rule Interpreter
137
BACON an Illustration
139
Chapter 8
143
The Systematicity Argument
144
Systematicity and Structured Behavior
146
Cognitive Architecture
150
Two Kinds of Cognitive Science
152
Grammar Rules and Descriptivism
154
k Naive Physics in the Head?
157
Refusing the Syntactic Challenge
160
Chapter 9
161
The Pinker and Prince Critique
165
Pathology
168
And the Moral of the Story Is
169
The Theoretical Analysis of Mixed Models
172
Chapter 10
177
Building a Thinker
178
Explaining a Thinker
180
Some Caveats
183
Epilogue The Parable of the HighLevel Architect
185
Appendix Beyond Eliminativism
187
Levels of Description of Connectionist Systems
188
SelfMonitoring Connectionist Systems
202
Index
221
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About the author (1989)

Andy Clark is Doctor of Philosophy at the School of Cognitive and Computing Sciences at the University of Sussex.

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