Miguel Street

Front Cover
A stranger could drive through Miguel Street and just say 'Slum!' because he could see no more. But to it's residents this derelict corner of Trinidad's capital is a complete world, where everybody is quite different from everybody else...Set during World War II and narrated by an unnamed - but precociously observant - neighbourhood boy, Miguel Street is a work of mercurial mood shifts, by turns sweetly melancholy and anarchically funny. It overflows with life on every page.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - stef7sa - LibraryThing

Amusing portraits of the characteristic inhabitants of a street in a poor neighbourhood on Trinidad, seen through the eyes of the young author. Not spectacular in contents and neither in style. The storylines become predictable at about twothirds of the book. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - starbox - LibraryThing

'A galaxy of characters',, December 7, 2014 By sally tarbox This review is from: Miguel Street (Paperback) The narrator looks back at his youth on a street in 1940s Port of Spain, Trinidad. "A ... Read full review

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Selected pages

Contents

BOGART
1
THE THING WITHOUT A NAME
8
GEORGE AND THE PINK HOUSE
15
HIS CHOSEN CALLING
24
MANMAN
32
B WORDSWORTH
40
THE COWARD
49
THE PYROTECHNICIST
59
THE MATERNAL INSTINCT
81
THE BLUE CART
90
LOVE LOVE LOVE ALONE
100
THE MECHANICAL GENIUS
115
CAUTION
130
UNTIL THE SOLDIERS CAME
141
HAT
157
HOW I LEFT MIGUEL STREET
170

TITUS HOYT IA
70

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About the author (2000)

Vidiadhar Surajprasad Naipaul was born of Indian ancestry in Chaguanas, Trinidad on August 17, 1932. He was educated at University College, Oxford and lived in Great Britain since 1950. From 1954 to 1956, he edited a radio program on literature for the British Broadcasting Corporation's Caribbean Service. His first novel, The Mystic Masseur, was published in 1957. His other novels included A House for Mr. Biswas, A Bend in the River, Guerrillas, and Half a Life. In a Free State won the Booker Prize in 1971. He started writing nonfiction in the 1960s. His first nonfiction book, The Middle Passage, was published in 1962. His other nonfiction works included An Area of Darkness, Among the Believers, Beyond Belief, and A Turn in the South. He was knighted in 1990 and received the Nobel Prize in Literature in 2001. He died on August 11, 2018 at the age of 85.

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