Mind, Self, and Society: From the Standpoint of a Social Behaviorist

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University of Chicago Press, 1934 - Psychology - 400 pages
3 Reviews
Written from the standpoint of the social behaviorist, this treatise contains the heart of Mead's position on social psychology. The analysis of language is of major interest, as it supplied for the first time an adequate treatment of the language mechanism in relation to scientific and philosophical issues.

"If philosophical eminence be measured by the extent to which a man's writings anticipate the focal problems of a later day and contain a point of view which suggests persuasive solutions to many of them, then George Herbert Mead has justly earned the high praise bestowed upon him by Dewey and Whitehead as a 'seminal mind of the very first order.'"—Sidney Hook, The Nation

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Review: Mind, Self, and Society: From the Standpoint of a Social Behaviorist

User Review  - Matthew Giobbi - Goodreads

We forget Mead, but remember Piaget who repeated him. Read full review

Review: Mind, Self, and Society: From the Standpoint of a Social Behaviorist

User Review  - David Kirschner - Goodreads

Required continual reading for me while in grad school. Read full review

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About the author (1934)

George Herbert Mead, an American social psychologist, taught at the University of Chicago for his entire career. The task he set for himself was to explain how humans learn to think in abstractions, become self-conscious, and behave purposefully and morally. He contended that these attributes rest on language and are acquired and maintained through group life. Social psychology, for Mead, was the study of regularities in individual behavior that result from participation in groups. Mead was very much influenced by pragmatist philosophers, especially John Dewey and Charles H. Cooley. He was something of a cult figure during and after his lifetime; he published no books, and his posthumous books were reconstructed from his notes and from the notes of students. He was a man far ahead of his time, and many of the concepts he developed at the turn of the century are widely accepted today: the selective nature of perception, cognition through linguistic symbols, role playing, decision processes, reference groups, and socialization through participation in group activities.

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