Ministerial Ethics: Moral Formation for Church Leaders

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Baker Academic, 2004 - Religion - 288 pages
2 Reviews
Ministerial Ethics provides both new and experienced pastors with tools for sharpening their personal and professional decision-making skills. The authors seek to explain the unique moral role of the minister and the ethical responsibilities of the vocation and to provide "a clear statement of the ethical obligations contemporary clergy should assume in their personal and professional lives." Trull and Carter deal with such areas as family life, confidentiality, truth-telling, political involvement, working with committees, and relating to other church staff members.

First published in 1993, this edition has been thoroughly updated throughout and contains expanded sections on theological foundations, the role of character, confidentiality, and the timely topic of clergy sexual abuse. Appendices describing various denominational ministerial codes of ethics are included.
 

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User Review  - juemaine - Christianbook.com

that book was given to me by one of my instructors at school. it was such a blessing until i gave two away to friends of mine. everyone don't have assess to proper training even in this day and time. Read full review

User Review  - Clay - Christianbook.com

Very informative, a great resource! I found it to be very detailed and the reference material used by the authors is great! Read full review

Contents

Preface to the Second Edition
9
Career or Profession?
21
Endowed or Acquired?
43
Incidental or Intentional?
65
Friend or Foe?
89
Cooperation or Competition?
119
Threat or Opportunity?
139
Clergy Sexual Abuse
161
Help or Hindrance?
185
A Procedure for Responding to Charges
217
Contemporary Denominational Codes
229
Ministerial and Parachurch Groups Codes
241
Sample Codes of Ethics
259
Notes
265
Index
284
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

Joe E. Trull (ThD, Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary) is editor of Christian Ethics Today and formerly served as professor of Christian ethics at New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary. James E. Carter (1935-2015; PhD, Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary) was a pastor with over thirty years of experience. He served as director of Church-Minister Relations for the Louisiana Baptist Convention from 1988-2000.

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