Mixed Blood: Intermarriage and Ethnic Identity in Twentieth-century America

Front Cover
Univ of Wisconsin Press, 1991 - Social Science - 532 pages
0 Reviews
Draws together a far-ranging set of experiences, all of which bear on the phenomenon of intermarriage. Through his introduction of cultural themes of acceptance, the author broadens the reader's scope of reference in comprehending the forces driving intermarriage.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

Mixed blood: intermarriage and ethnic identity in twentieth-century America

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Spickard, professor of history at Capital University, has written a massive study of the interrelationships between intermarriage and ethnic identity. Focusing on three groups--Japanese-Americans ... Read full review

Contents

Fu Manchu and Charlie Chan
25
Old Barriers Fall
47
Japanese American
94
Summary of Part I
118
Summary of Part II
158
Separate Identity amid
180
According to the Halakhah
207
Summary of Part III
229
The Core of the Heart
235
The Wall Remains
268
Passing Is Passe
312
Summary of Part IV
340
Summary of States Laws
374
Bibliography
474
Index
523
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1991)

Paul R. Spickard is professor of history at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He is the author of many books including Race and Nation: Ethnic Systems in the Modern World and Almost All Aliens: Immigration, Race, and Colonialism in American History and Identity.

Bibliographic information