Models in Ecology

Front Cover
CUP Archive, Nov 2, 1978 - Nature - 146 pages
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This book is aimed at anyone with a serious interest in ecology. Ecological models of two kinds are dealt with: mathematical models of a strategic kind aimed at an understanding of the general properties of ecosystems and laboratory models designed with the same aim in view. The mathematical and experimental models illuminate one another. A strength of the account is that although there is a good deal of mathematics, Professor Maynard Smith has concentrated on making clear the assumptions behind the mathematics and the conclusions to be drawn. Proofs and derivations have been omitted as far as possible. The book is therefore comprehensible to anyone with a minimal familiarity with mathematical notation. This book was written in the twin convictions that ecology will not come of age until it has a sound theoretical basis and there is a long way to go before that state of affairs is reached.
 

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Contents

Twospecies interactions or complexity per seJ
5
F Stochastic and deterministic models
12
B Volterras equations
19
Some special cases
25
F The functional response of predators
31
b Delays due to development time
38
Predatorprey systems with age structure page
47
Competition
59
Migration
69
Stability and complexity an introduction
85
Complexity at a single trophic level
98
Complexity with several trophic levels
104
Coevolution page
116
Natural selection and territory
130
Index
143
Copyright

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About the author (1978)

John Maynard Smith is an eminent evolutionary biologist and author of many books on evolution, both for scientists and the general public. He is professor emeritus at the University of Sussex, UK, Fellow of the Royal Society, winner of the Darwin Medal, and laureate of the Crafoord Prize of the
Swedish Academy of Sciences. David Harper is Senior Lecturer in Evolution, School of Biological Sciences, University of Sussex, UK.

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