Modern C++ Design: Generic Programming and Design Patterns Applied

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Addison-Wesley Professional, 2001 - Computers - 323 pages
25 Reviews

Modern C++ Design is an important book. Fundamentally, it demonstrates 'generic patterns' or 'pattern templates' as a powerful new way of creating extensible designs in C++-a new way to combine templates and patterns that you may never have dreamt was possible, but is. If your work involves C++ design and coding, you should read this book. Highly recommended.
-Herb Sutter

What's left to say about C++ that hasn't already been said? Plenty, it turns out.
-From the Foreword by John Vlissides

In Modern C++ Design, Andrei Alexandrescu opens new vistas for C++ programmers. Displaying extraordinary creativity and programming virtuosity, Alexandrescu offers a cutting-edge approach to design that unites design patterns, generic programming, and C++, enabling programmers to achieve expressive, flexible, and highly reusable code.

This book introduces the concept of generic components-reusable design templates that produce boilerplate code for compiler consumption-all within C++. Generic components enable an easier and more seamless transition from design to application code, generate code that better expresses the original design intention, and support the reuse of design structures with minimal recoding.

The author describes the specific C++ techniques and features that are used in building generic components and goes on to implement industrial strength generic components for real-world applications. Recurring issues that C++ developers face in their day-to-day activity are discussed in depth and implemented in a generic way. These include:

  • Policy-based design for flexibility
  • Partial template specialization
  • Typelists-powerful type manipulation structures
  • Patterns such as Visitor, Singleton, Command, and Factories
  • Multi-method engines

For each generic component, the book presents the fundamental problems and design options, and finally implements a generic solution.

In addition, an accompanying Web site, http: //www.awl.com/cseng/titles/0-201-70431-5, makes the code implementations available for the generic components in the book and provides a free, downloadable C++ library, called Loki, created by the author. Loki provides out-of-the-box functionality for virtually any C++ project.

Get a value-added service! Try out all the examples from this book at www.codesaw.com. CodeSaw is a free online learning tool that allows you to experiment with live code from your book right in your browser.

0201704315B11102003

 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Tobias.Bruell - LibraryThing

Collection of the authors ideas about template programming. The book left me with a considerably deeper understanding of template programming. Unfortunately, the content is structured in such a way ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - nillacat - LibraryThing

This book is a tour-de-force of hacking, the fine art of making complicated systems do things far exceeding the original goals of their design. It is a shame that all this ingenuity and creativity is ... Read full review

Contents

PolicyBased Class Design
3
12 The Failure of the DoItAll Interface
4
13 Multiple Inheritance to the Rescue?
5
14 The Benefit of Templates
6
15 Policies and Policy Classes
7
16 Enriched Policies
12
18 Optional Functionality Through Incomplete Instantiation
13
19 Combining Policy Classes
14
The Phoenix Singleton
137
Singletons with Longevity
139
68 Implementing Singletons with Longevity
142
69 Living in a Multithreaded World
145
610 Putting It All Together
148
611 Working with SingletonHolder
153
612 Summary
155
Smart Pointers
157

110 Customizing Structure with Policy Classes
16
111 Compatible and Incompatible Policies
17
112 Decomposing a Class into Policies
19
113 Summary
20
Techniques
23
22 Partial Template Specialization
26
23 Local Classes
28
24 Mapping Integral Constants to Types
29
25 TypetoType Mapping
31
26 Type Selection
33
27 Detecting Convertibility and Inheritance at Compile Time
34
28 A Wrapper Around type_info
37
29 NullType and EmptyType
39
210 Type Traits
40
211 Summary
46
Typelists
49
32 Defining Typelists
51
33 Linearizing Typelist Creation
52
34 Calculating Length
53
35 Intermezzo
54
36 Indexed Access
55
37 Searching Typelists
56
38 Appending to Typelists
57
39 Erasing a Type from a Typelist
58
310 Erasing Duplicates
59
311 Replacing an Element in a Typelist
60
312 Partially Ordering Typelists
61
313 Class Generation with Typelists
64
314 Summary
74
315 Typelist Quick Facts
75
SmallObject Allocation
77
41 The Default Free Store Allocator
78
43 A SmallObject Allocator
80
44 Chunks
81
45 The FixedSize Allocator
84
46 The SmallObjAllocator Class
87
47 A Hat Trick
89
48 Simple Complicated Yet Simple in the End
92
49 Administrivia
93
410 Summary
94
Components
97
Generalized Functors
99
51 The Command Design Pattern
100
52 Command in the Real World
102
53 C++ Callable Entities
103
54 The Functor Class Template Skeleton
104
operator
108
56 Handling Functors
110
57 Build One Get One Free
112
58 Argument and Return Type Conversions
114
59 Handling Pointers to Member Functions
115
510 Binding
119
511 Chaining Requests
122
Heap Allocation
124
514 Implementing Undo and Redo with Functor
125
515 Summary
126
Implementing Singletons
129
61 Static Data + Static Functions Singleton
130
62 The Basic C++ Idioms Supporting Singletons
131
63 Enforcing the Singletons Uniqueness
132
64 Destroying the Singleton
133
65 The Dead Reference Problem
135
72 The Deal
158
73 Storage of Smart Pointers
160
74 Smart Pointer Member Functions
161
75 OwnershipHandling Strategies
163
76 The Addressof Operator
170
77 Implicit Conversion to Raw Pointer Types
171
78 Equality and Inequality
173
79 Ordering Comparisons
178
710 Checking and Error Reporting
181
711 Smart Pointers to const and const Smart Pointers
182
712 Arrays
183
713 Smart Pointers and Multithreading
184
714 Putting It All Together
187
715 Summary
194
Object Factories
197
81 The Need for Object Factories
198
Classes and Objects
200
83 Implementing an Object Factory
201
84 Type Identifiers
206
85 Generalization
207
86 Minutiae
210
87 Clone Factories
211
88 Using Object Factories with Other Generic Components
215
89 Summary
216
811 CloneFactory Class Template Quick Facts
217
Abstract Factory
219
92 A Generic Abstract Factory Interface
223
93 Implementing AbstractFactory
226
94 A PrototypeBased Abstract Factory Implementation
228
95 Summary
233
Visitor
235
102 Overloading and the CatchAil Function
242
The Acyclic Visitor
243
104 A Generic Implementation of Visitor
248
105 Back to the Cyclic Visitor
255
106 Hooking Variations
258
107 Summary
260
108 Visitor Generic Components Quick Facts
261
Multimethods
263
111 What Are Multimethods?
264
Brute Force
265
11 4 The BruteForce Approach Automated
268
115 Symmetry with the BruteForce Dispatcher
273
116 The Logarithmic Double Dispatcher
276
117 FnDi spatcher and Symmetry
282
static_cast or dynamic_cast?
285
Raw Speed
290
1111 BasicDispatcher and BasicFastDispatcher as Policies
293
1112 Looking Forward
294
1113 Summary
296
1114 Double Dispatcher Quick Facts
297
A Minimalist Multithreading Library
301
A1 A Critique of Multithreading
302
A2 Lokis Approach
303
A4 Mutexes
305
A5 Locking Semantics in ObjectOriented Programming
306
A6 Optional volatile Modifier
308
A7 Semaphores Events and Other Good Things
309
Bibliography
311
Index
313
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About the author (2001)

Andrei Alexandrescu is the author of the award-winning book Modern C++ Design (Addison-Wesley, 2001) and is a columnist for C/C++ Users Journal.



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