Modified Citrus Pectin (MCP): A Super Nutraceutical

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Basic Health Publications, Inc., Jan 2, 2004 - Health & Fitness - 43 pages
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Modified citrus pectin (MCP) is an amazing substance backed by impressive research. In this book, you'll learn that in addition to having the same beneficial effects as pectin, from which it is derived, MCP also has the extraordinary added benefit of protecting against cancer, cancer progression, and heart disease. Of all diseases, MCP has been studied most extensively for prostate cancer, one of the most common cancers in men. MCP has been shown to slow PSA doubling time, to stop the spread of prostate cancer, and to kill prostate cancer cells. Moreover, you'll learn how it may lower cholesterol, reduce atherosclerosis, remove heavy metals and environmental toxins from the body, and prevent and reduce the symptoms of Alzheimer's disease.
 

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Contents

1 How Pectin Can Improve Your Health
5
2 What Is Modified Citrus Pectin MCP?
7
3 Cancer and the Role of Galectins
12
4 MCP for Prostate Cancer
17
5 MCP for Other Cancers
21
6 MCP Prevents Cancer
24
7 The Future of MCP
25
8 How to Use MCP
31
9 Choosing MCP Products
33
1O Auxiliary Products
35
Conclusion
36
Resources
38
References
39
Index
41
About the Author
43
Copyright

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Page 40 - Effect of dietary alfalfa, pectin, and wheat bran on azoxymethane or methylnitrosourea-induced colon carcinogenesis in F344 rats.
Page 40 - Effects of natural complex carbohydrate (citrus pectin) on murine melanoma cell properties related to galectin-3 functions." Glycoconj J. 1994; 11(6): 527-32. Nangia-Makker P, V Hogan, Y Honjo, et al. "Inhibition of human cancer cell growth and metastasis in nude mice by oral intake of modified citrus pectin.
Page 5 - According to a study published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, in...
Page 40 - Inhibition of spontaneous metastasis in a rat prostate cancer model by oral administration of modified citrus pectin.
Page 40 - E. Willumsen N, Berge RK. A study on lipid metabolism in heart and liver of cholesterol and pectin-fed rats.

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About the author (2004)

Nan Kathryn Fuchs, Ph.D., is the author of "The Nutrition Detective.

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