Monad to Man: The Concept of Progress in Evolutionary Biology

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Harvard University Press, Jun 30, 2009 - Science - 648 pages
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In interviews with today's major figures in evolutionary biology--including Stephen Jay Gould, E. O. Wilson, Ernst Mayr, and John Maynard Smith--Ruse offers an unparalleled account of evolutionary theory, from popular books to museums to the most complex theorizing, at a time when its status as science is under greater scrutiny than ever before.
 

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Monad to man: the concept of progress in evolutionary biology

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Evolution has stirred heated social debate from before the time of Darwin to the present, perhaps especially today. Ruse, a philosopher of bioethics and evolutionary biology at the University of ... Read full review

Contents

Introduction
1
1 Progress and Culture
19
2 The Birth of Evolutionism
42
3 The Nineteenth Century From Cuvier to Owen
84
4 Charles Darwin and Progress
136
5 Evolution as World View
178
6 The Professional Biologists
205
7 Evolution Travels West
244
10 The Genetics of Populations
362
11 The Synthesis
410
12 Professional Evolutionism
456
13 Contemporary Debates
485
14 Conclusion
526
Notes
541
Bibliography
549
Credits
597

8 British Evolutionists and Mendelian Genetics
285
9 Discipline Building in Britian
321

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About the author (2009)

Michael Ruse is Lucyle T. Werkmeister Professor of Philosophy and Director of the Program in the History and Philosophy of Science, Florida State University. He is the founder and editor of the journal Biology and Philosophy, and has appeared on ldquo;Quirks and Quarksrdquo; and the Discovery Channel.

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