The Moon Bridge

Front Cover
Scholastic Inc., 1995 - Japanese Americans - 240 pages
3 Reviews
When Mitzi and her Japanese-American family are moved to an internment camp during the Second World War, she and her best friend, the rebellious Ruthie, plan to meet after the war at Golden Gate Park. Reprint.
 

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User Review  - sosandra - LibraryThing

The Moon Bridge is a tale of friendship set amidst the taunting and jeering of middle school children during World War II, particularly after the bombing of Pearl Harbor. Ruthie Fox’s world is shaken ... Read full review

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It's 1941 and World War II has just started. Ruth "Ruthie" Fox is best friends with Shirley "Shirl" Steadman. But their friendship gets intense when Shirl and Barbara T. start bullying a Japanese-American girl named Mitsuko "Mitzi" Fujimoto. And Shirl's birthday party is coming up! Ruthie knows that it's wrong to be mean to Mitzi, but Shirl keeps getting mad about it. One day, BOOM! Shirl uninvites Ruthie to her party at the Chinese Tea Garden. The Chinese Tea Garden was originally the Japanese Tea Garden until the war began. Ruthie feels irritated at Mitzi because she wasn't invited to the party. But after seeing Mitzi feeling so frightened to come to school, Ruthie forgives her and they become best friends. Then one day, some boys from school break a window of Joe's Groceries, Mitzi's uncle's store in Japantown. Ruthie's parents believe that the Japanese will be sent to internment camps because they are allegedly spying for Japan. That became true. Ruthie begins writing to Mitzi for the next three years and four months. Mitzi and her family, at first, are at Tanforan Racetrack (now Tanforan Mall in present day). But then they are moved to Arkansas. The war finally ends in 1945 and the Japanese can finally return home. Ruthie and Mitzi agree through letters to meet at the Moon Bridge, their favorite spot, at the Chinese Tea Garden. They finally see each other and have very warm greetings and relax in front of the Moon Bridge. 

Contents

I
1
II
7
III
13
IV
18
V
26
VI
31
VII
41
VIII
47
XIV
107
XV
113
XVI
126
XVII
133
XVIII
140
XIX
151
XX
163
XXI
177

IX
59
X
69
XI
77
XII
84
XIII
95
XXII
188
XXIII
196
XXIV
204
XXV
226
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