Moral Development Theories--secular and Religious: A Comparative Study

Front Cover
Greenwood Publishing Group, 1997 - Religion - 311 pages
Moral Development Theories--Secular and Religious introduces readers to 13 secular models and 13 religious theories in a wide-ranging comparative study of the roots of moral development. The secular models include attribution theory, cognitive-structural views, social-learning and social-cognition approaches, Freud's psychoanalysis (plus Erikson and Fromm), Marxist beliefs, a composite theory, Hoffman's conception of empathy, Anderson's information-integration view, Gilligan's gender distinction, Sutherland and Cressey's explanation of delinquency, and Lovinger on ego development. Religious theories represent the Judaic-Christian-Islamic line, Hinduism and derivatives (Buddhism, Jainism, Sikhism), Confucianism, Shinto, and four minor theories drawn from the belief systems of the Navajo, Zulus, Vodou adherents, and Okinawans.
 

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Contents

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III
IV
19
V
25
VI
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VIII
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XVIII
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X
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About the author (1997)

R. MURRAY THOMAS is Professor Emeritus of Educational Psychology at the University of California, Santa Barbara.

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