Moral Culture of Infancy [by Mrs. M. M.], and Kindergarten guide, with music for the plays. By ... E. P. Peabody

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T. O. P. Burnhan, 1864 - Kindergarten - 216 pages
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Page 13 - Children,' observes Miss Peabody, ' begin with loving others ; ' and she has added from the stores of her own experience among the young this aphorism of a wise philosophy : ' Children begin with loving others quite as intensely as they love themselves — forgetting themselves in their love of others — if they only have as fair a chance of being benevolent and self-sacrificing as of being selfish. Sympathy is as much a natural instinct as self-love, and no more or less innocent in a moral point...
Page 11 - One impulse from a vernal wood May teach you more of man, Of moral evil and of good Than all the sages can.
Page 14 - There are who ask not if thine eye Be on them; who, in love and truth, Where no misgiving is, rely Upon the genial sense of youth : Glad Hearts! without reproach or blot Who do thy work, and know it not: Oh!
Page 11 - ... of beauty and use, and the means of giving them opportunity to be perfected. On the other hand, while he knows that they must not be forced against their individual natures, he does not leave them to grow wild, but prunes redundancies, removes destructive worms and bugs from their leaves and stems, and weeds from their vicinity, — carefully watching to learn what peculiar insects affect what particular plants, and how the former can be destroyed without injuring the vitality of the latter....
Page 20 - ReadingBook," and when she had taught the class to make all the words on the first page of it, she gave each of the children the book, and told them to find first one word and then another. It was a great pleasure to them to be told that now they could read. They were encouraged to copy the words out of the book upon their slates. The " First Nursery Reading-Book " has in it no words that have exceptions in their spelling to the sounds given to the children as the powers of the letters. Nor has it...
Page 14 - Kindergarten, then, is children in society, — a commonwealth or republic of children, — whose laws are all part and parcel of the Higher Law alone. It may be contrasted, in every particular, with the old-fashioned school, which is an absolute monarchy...
Page 20 - ... read. They were encouraged to copy the words out of the book upon their slates. The "First Nursery Reading-Book" has in it no words that have exceptions in their spelling to the sounds given to the children as the powers of the letters. Nor has it any diphthong or combinations of letters, such as oi, ou, ch, sh, th. After they could read it at sight, they were told that all words were not so regular, and their attention was called to the initial sounds of thin, shin, and chin, and to the proper...
Page 12 - Tending babies is anjrt, and every art is founded on a science of observations ; for love is not wisdom, but love must act according to wisdom in order to succeed. Mothers and nurses, however tender and kind-hearted, may, and of'tenest do, weary and vex the nerves of children, in well-meant efforts to amuse them, and weary themselves the while. Froebel'a exercises, founded on the observations of an intelligent sensibility, are intended to amuse without wearying, to educate without vexing.
Page 19 - Another lesson gave the vowels, (or voice-letters, as she called them,) and it was made lively by her writing afterwards all of them in one word, mieaou, and calling it the cat's song. It took from a week to ten days to teach these letters, one lesson a day of about twenty minutes. Then came words : mamma, papa, puss, pussy, etc. The vowels always sounded as in Italian, and i and y were distinguished as with a dot and with a tail. At first only one word was the lesson, and the letters were reviewed...
Page 19 - Write it by making two little marks meet at the bottom." This last letter was made a separate lesson of, and the other lessons were reviewed. The teacher then said, — " Now you have learned some letters, — all the lip-letters," — making them over, and asking what each was. She afterwards added w, — giving its power and form, and put it with the lip-letters. At the next lesson they were told to make the letters with their lips, and she wrote them down on the board, and then said, — " Now...

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