Moral Theory: An Introduction

Front Cover
Rowman & Littlefield, 2002 - Philosophy - 291 pages
0 Reviews
What makes an action right or wrong? Why is something good or bad? How does one make moral decisions about what is right and good? These are among the main questions of ethics. This book explores some of the most historically important and currently debated moral theories about the nature of the right and good. After introducing students in the first chapter to some of the main aims and methods of evaluating a moral theory, the remaining chapters are devoted to an examination of various moral theories including the divine command theory, moral relativism, natural law theory, Kant's moral theory, moral pluralism, virtue ethics, and moral particularism. Providing an introduction to moral theory that explains and critically examines the theories of such classical moral philosophers as Aristotle, Aquinas, Kant, Bentham, Mill, and Ross, this book acquaints students with the work of contemporary moral philosophers.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

An Introduction to Moral Theory
1
Divine Command Theory
23
Moral Relativism
37
Natural Law Theory
65
Classical Utilitarianism
103
Contemporary Utilitarianism
131
Kants Moral Theory
151
Moral Pluralism
189
Moral Particularism
245
Conclusion
267
Standards for Evaluating Moral Theories
271
Glossary
273
References
281
Index
285
About the Author
291
Copyright

Virtue Ethics
211

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

Ethics Without Principles
Jonathan Dancy
No preview available - 2004
All Book Search results »

About the author (2002)

Mark Timmons is professor of philosophy at the University of Memphis and author of Morality without Foundations (Oxford, 1999). He has published extensively in the areas of ethics and moral theory.

Bibliographic information