More Than Just a Game: Sports in American Life Since 1945

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Columbia University Press, Aug 13, 2013 - History - 304 pages
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More Than Just a Game tracks the explosion of the sports industry in the United States since 1945 and how it has shaped class, racial, gender, and national identities. By examining both professional and intercollegiate sports such as baseball, football, basketball, golf, tennis, and stock car racing, Kathryn Jay looks at the impact of packaging, salary, hype, corporate sponsorship, drug use, and the presence of women and African American players. Jay also considers the persistent belief that sports encourage good citizenship and morality despite a rise in cheating and violent behavior and an unabashed emphasis on financial gain. More Than Just a Game is a fascinating exploration of a phenomenon that has engaged the American imagination and thrilled fans for decades.
 

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More than just a game: sports in American life since 1945

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Most current books on American sports history cover early America up to the present. Jay (director, American studies, Barnard Coll.) instead focuses on the postwar era, which allows her to treat in ... Read full review

Contents

Introduction
1
1 Sports the American Way
9
2 An Athletic Cold War
45
3 A Brave New World
79
PHOTOGRAPHS
112
4 Making Sense of the Sixties
113
5 Walking the Picket Line and Fighting for Rights
146
6 Competing on the Open Market
180
7 HighPriced Heroes Go Global
217
Notes
243
Bibliography
257
Index
269
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About the author (2013)

Kathryn Jay was most recently an assistant professor of history and director of American studies at Barnard College.


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