Mortality

Front Cover
Allen & Unwin, Sep 1, 2012 - Biography & Autobiography - 144 pages
During the US book tour for his memoir, Hitch-22, Christopher Hitchens collapsed in his New York hotel room to excoriating pain in his chest and thorax. As he would later write in the first of a series of deeply moving Vanity Fair pieces, he was being deported 'from the country of the well across the stark frontier that marks off the land of malady.' Until his death in 2011 he underwent the brutal gamut of modern cancer treatment, enduring catastrophic levels of suffering and eventually losing his voice.

Mortality is the most meditative piece of writing Hitchens has ever produced; at once an unsparingly honest account of the ravages of his disease, an examination of cancer bathroom etiquette, and the coda to a lifetime of fierce debate and peerless prose. In this eloquent confrontation of mortality, Hitchens returns a human face to a disease that has become a contemporary cipher of suffering.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - jonfaith - www.librarything.com

Powerful, unfinished and surprising: despite hearing his widow on NPR a few weeks ago I was unprepared for Nietzsche forming the central dialogue of this undernourished polemic. Much is drawn into ... Read full review

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User Review  - adam.currey - www.librarything.com

If you're already a fan of Hitchens, this is a must-read. If you're not, then it probably won't mean much to you - perhaps you'd be better off starting elsewhere. Hitchens applies his trademark wit ... Read full review

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About the author (2012)

Christopher Hitchens (1949-2011), 'one of the most prolific, and well as brilliant, journalists of our time' (Observer), was a contributing editor to Vanity Fair and a visiting professor of liberal studies at the New School in New York. The most recent of his numerous books are the international bestsellers God is Not Great, Hitch-22 and Arguably.

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