Mother

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D. Appleton, 1921 - 498 pages
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Page 185 - Raising his hand and shaking it, he began slowly in a solemn tone of assurance with faith and with strength: "There will come a time, I know, when people will take delight in one another, when each will be like a star to the other, and when each will listen to his fellow as to music. The free men will walk upon the earth, men great in their freedom; they will walk with open hearts, and the heart of each will be pure of envy and greed, and therefore all mankind will be without malice, and there will...
Page 178 - There is still much suffering in store for the people, much of their blood will yet flow, squeezed out by the hands of greed ; but for all that, all my suffering, all my blood is a small price for that which is already stirring in my breast, in my mind, in the marrow of my bones ! I am already rich, as a star is rich in golden rays. And I will bear all, will suffer all because there is within me a joy which no one, nothing can ever stifle ! In this joy there is a world of strength.
Page 178 - Russian, standing in the doorway, his eyes aglow with a bright flame, "there is still much suffering in store for the people, much of their blood will yet flow, squeezed out by the hands of greed; but all that — all my suffering, all my blood, is a small price for that which is already stirring in my breast, in my mind, in the marrow of my bones! I am already rich, as a star is rich in golden rays. And I will bear all, I will suffer all, because there is within me a joy which no one, which nothing...
Page 4 - Meeting one another they spoke about the factory and the machines, had their fling against their foreman, conversed and thought only of matters closely and manifestly connected with their work. Only rarely, and then but faintly, did solitary sparks of impotent thought glimmer in the wearisome monotony of their talk. Returning home they quarreled with their wives, and often beat them, unsparing of their fists. The young people sat in the taverns, or enjoyed evening parties at one another's houses,...
Page 235 - Go you, too, Matvey! That's the right cause, that's the honest cause!'" He stopped abruptly, and a sullen silence fell on all, in the powerful grip of something huge and new, but something that no longer frightened them. Sizov lifted his hand, shook it, and continued: "It's an old man who is speaking to you. You know me! I've been working here thirty-nine years, and I've been alive fifty-three years. To-day they've arrested my nephew, a pure and intelligent boy. He, too, was in the front, side by...
Page 4 - ... alcohol as a matter of course. Sometimes Maksim Gorkii's description of the hapless life of the worker under Tsarism is also cited: The day was swallowed up by the factory; the machine sucked out of men's muscles as much vigor as it needed. The day was blotted out from life, not a trace of it left. Men made another imperceptible step toward his grave; but he saw close before him the delights of rest, the joys of the odorous tavern, and he was satisfied.
Page 4 - ... factory; the machine sucked out of men's muscles as much vigor as it needed. The day was blotted out from life, not a trace of it left. Men made another imperceptible step toward his grave; but he saw close before him the delights of rest, the joys of the odorous tavern, and he was satisfied. . . . The accumulated exhaustion of years had robbed them of their appetites, and to be able to eat they drank, long and deep, goading on their feeble stomachs with the biting, burning, lash of vodka. ....
Page 4 - States and ether countries. seeks solace in alcohol as a matter of course. Sometimes Maksim Gorkii's description of the hapless life of the worker under Tsarism is also cited: The day was swallowed up by the factory; the machine sucked out of men's muscles as much vigor as it needed. The day was blotted out from life, not a trace of it left.
Page 5 - Returning home they quarreled with their wives, and often beat them, unsparing of their fists. The young people sat in the taverns, or enjoyed evening parties at one another's houses, played the accordion, sang vulgar songs devoid of beauty, danced, talked ribaldry, and drank. Exhausted with toil, men drank swiftly, and in every heart there awoke and grew an incomprehensible, sickly irritation. It demanded an outlet. Clutching tenaciously at every pretext for unloading themselves of this disquieting...
Page 76 - God created Man in His Own Image and after His Own Likeness, Original Man must be the Manifestation of Perfection.

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