Mother of My Heart, Daughter of My Dreams: Kali and Uma in the Devotional Poetry of Bengal

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Oxford University Press, Jun 28, 2001 - Religion - 464 pages
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This book chronicles the rise of goddess worship in the region of Bengal from the middle of the eighteenth century to the present. Focusing on the goddesses Kali and Uma, McDermott examines lyrical poems written by devotees from Ramprasad Sen (ca. 1718-1775) to Kazi Nazrul Islam (1899-1976).
 

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Contents

VII
15
VIII
17
IX
20
X
22
XI
25
XII
26
XIII
28
XIV
31
XXIX
161
XXX
162
XXXI
172
XXXII
176
XXXIII
178
XXXIV
200
XXXV
202
XXXVI
204

XV
33
XVI
37
XVII
40
XVIII
63
XIX
78
XX
84
XXI
85
XXII
107
XXIII
122
XXIV
128
XXV
131
XXVI
145
XXVII
147
XXVIII
154
XXXVIII
205
XXXIX
224
XL
230
XLI
232
XLIII
237
XLIV
275
XLV
286
XLVI
292
XLVII
298
XLVIII
305
XLIX
317
L
411
LI
423
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Page 21 - Sacking the villages and towns of the surrounding tracts, and engaging in slaughter and captures, they set fire to granaries and spared no vestige of fertility. And when the stores and granaries of Burdwan were exhausted, and the supply of imported grains was also completely cut off, to avert death by starvation, human beings ate plantain roots, whilst animals were fed on the leaves of trees.
Page 25 - Burdwan, whose province had been the first cry out and the last to which plenty returned, died miserably towards the end of the famine, leaving a treasury so empty that the heir had to melt down the family plate, and when this was exhausted to beg a loan from the Government, in order to perform his father's obsequies.
Page 21 - Those murderous freebooters drowned in the rivers a large number of the people, after cutting off their ears, noses, and hands. Tying sacks of dirt to the mouths of others, they mangled and burnt them with indescribable tortures.
Page 25 - The ancient houses of Bengal, who had enjoyed a semi-independence under the Moghuls and whom the British Government subsequently acknowledged as the lords of the soil, fared still worse. From the year 1770 the ruin of two-thirds of the old aristocracy of Lower Bengal dates.

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