Mountain Home: The Wilderness Poetry of Ancient China

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David Hinton
New Directions Publishing, 2002 - Poetry - 295 pages
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The earliest and most extensive literary engagement with wilderness in human history, Mountain Home is vital poetry that feels utterly contemporary. China's tradition of "rivers-and-mountains" poetry stretches across millennia. This is a plain-spoken poetry of immediate day-to-day experience, and yet seems most akin to China's grand landscape paintings. Although its wisdom is ancient, rooted in Taoist and Zen thought, the work feels utterly contemporary, especially as rendered here in Hinton's rich and accessible translations. Mountain Home collects poems from 5th- through 13th-century China and includes the poets Li Po, Po Chu-i and Tu Fu. The "rivers-and-mountains" tradition covers a remarkable range of topics: comic domestic scenes, social protest, travel, sage recluses, and mountain landscapes shaped into forms of enlightenment. And within this range, the poems articulate the experience of living as an organic part of the natural world and its processes. In an age of global ecological disruption and mass extinction, this tradition grows more urgently important every day. Mountain Home offers poems that will charm and inform not just readers of poetry, but also the large community of readers who are interested in environmental awareness.
 

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User Review  - anthonywillard - LibraryThing

This is a translation of selected poems of the poets of the classical Chinese Rivers and Mountains tradition. The selection of authors is satisfyingly wide. The poems are arranged by author, in ... Read full review

Contents

TAO CHIEN 365427
5
In Reply to MulberryBramble Liu
11
Cha Festival Day
17
Climbing GreenCliff Mountain in Yungchia
23
On StoneGate Mountains Highest Peak
34
TANG DYNASTY 618907
41
Autumn Begins
44
Climbing DeerGate Mountain Thoughts of Ancient Times
50
MENG CHIAO751814
142
Liu TSUNGYUAN 773819
150
Before Crossing the Ridges
156
Autumn Thoughts Sent Far Away
162
My Thatched Mountain Hut Just Finished CAVSited
168
After Quiet Joys at South Garden Sent By Pei Tu
174
Sent to a Master of Silence on WhiteTower Mountain
180
Early Autumn Sent to be Inscribed on the Wall at
186

Climbing SouthView Mountains Highest Peak
56
In the Mountains Sent to Chan Brothers and Sisters
67
In Reply to ViceMagistrate Chang
73
At GoldenRidge
79
Spur of the Moment
85
ReverencePavilion Mountain Sitting Alone
86
Inscribed on a Wall at SummitTop Temple
92
Inscribed on the Wall at Changs Recluse Home
98
Reflections in Autumn i o 3
104
In Reply to a Letter from Meng 11
111
Climbing Above MindJewel Monastery
117
Evening View
123
Untitled Poems
129
The Han River
192
Climbing JoyAbroad Plateau
198
East River
204
Wandering on Bushel Mountain
211
Leaving the City
217
Sipping Wine at LakeView Tower
223
Theres a Small Monastery on the Cragged Heights
229
Partridge Sky
235
Lu Yu 11251210
241
To My Son Yii
247
Cold Sparrows
260
An Outline of Wilderness Thought in Ancient China
279
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About the author (2002)

David Hinton's many translations of classical Chinese poetry and philosophy have earned wide acclaim for creating compelling contemporary texts that convey the actual texture and density of the originals. He has been awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship as well as numerous fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Humanities. In 1997, he received the Landon Translation Award from the Academy of American Poets. He lives in East Calais, Vermont.

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