Mr Majeika

Front Cover
Puffin, Apr 25, 1985 - Magic - 94 pages
2 Reviews

As a rule, magic carpets don't turn up in schools, but this is exactly what happens when Class Three‚e(tm)s new teacher flies in through the classroom window and lands on the floor with a bump.

Mr Majeika can behave just like any ordinary teacher if he wants to, but something has to be done about Hamish Bigmore, the class nuisance, and so he uses a little magic to turn him into a frog. And to everyone's delight it looks as if Hamish will have to remain a frog because Mr Majeika can't remember the spell to turn him back again! With Mr Majeika in charge, suddenly life at school become much more exciting ‚e" there's even a magic-carpet ride to Buckingham Palace!

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - moe.k - LibraryThing

Mr Majeika is a new teacher for Class Three. There are many problem children in Class Three. Mr Majeika is loved by his classmates. His students call him Mr Magic. Because he can use magic. But he ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - debnance - LibraryThing

Class Three’s new teacher appears on a magic carpet and the adventures begin. Delightful. Read full review

Contents

Section 1
5
Section 2
7
Section 3
14
Copyright

8 other sections not shown

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About the author (1985)

Humphrey Carpenter worked at the BBC before becaming a full-time writer in 1975. He was the author of 14 of the well-loved Mr Majeika titles as well as two Shakespeare Without the Boring Bits titles for children. He was also the co-author, with his wife Mari Prichard, of The Oxford Companion to Children's Literature. He was an eminent figure in the world of adult literature and published award-winning biographies including, among others, those of J. R. R Tolkein, C. S. Lewis, W. H. Auden, Benjamin Britten and Spike Milligan. From 1994-1996 he directed the Cheltenham Festival of Literature and for many years he ran a young people's drama group, the Mushy Pea Theatre Company. He wrote plays for radio and theatre and was a regular contributor to the Guardian. Humphrey died in January 2005.

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