Mrs. Maxon Protests

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The Floating Press, Nov 1, 2012 - Fiction - 373 pages
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Anthony Hope's Mrs. Maxon Protests is a novel of female liberation that manages to be unpredictable and flout the conventions of the genre. Protagonist Winnie Maxon has done everything she was supposed to do in life, but finds her husband unbearable and the conventions of married life stifling. Is she strong enough to withstand the social pressure to conform and find true love on her own terms?
 

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Contents

Chapter I Inkpat
5
Chapter II A Case of Necessity
15
Chapter III In Solution
25
Chapter IV Keeping a Promise
36
Chapter V The Great Allies
48
Chapter VI Fruit of the Tree
60
Chapter VII A Code and a Theory
72
Chapter VIII Subversive
83
Chapter XVI A Word Taken at Pleasure
182
Chapter XVII The Track of the Raider
195
Chapter XVIII Nothing Serious
209
Chapter XIX A Point of Honour
224
Chapter XX An Heroic Offer
238
Chapter XXI Is He a Bully?
252
Chapter XXII Judgment Accordingly
267
Chapter XXIII The Regiment
281

Chapter IX No Proceedings
95
Chapter X Mauve Envelopes
107
Chapter XI An Unmentioned Name
118
Chapter XII Christmas in Woburn Square
131
Chapter XIII Christmas at Shaylors Patch
144
Chapter XIV A Counsel of Perfection
157
Chapter XV Mrs Nobody
169
Chapter XXIV An Enlightenment
294
Chapter XXV Perhaps
307
Chapter XXVI A Friend Departs
321
Chapter XXVII A Philosophical Project
332
Chapter XXVIII The View from a House
344
Chapter XXIX In the Result
358
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About the author (2012)

Novelist Anthony Hope-Hawkins was born in London, England on February 9, 1863. After attending Marlborough College and Balliol College, he became a lawyer and wrote short stories. The Prisoner of Zenda, his best-known work, was published in 1894. Due to the book's success, he became a full-time writer. During World War I, he worked for the Ministry of Information to counteract German propaganda. He was knighted for his efforts in 1918. He died of throat cancer in Surrey, England on July 8, 1933.

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