Multilateralism and U.S. Foreign Policy: Ambivalent Engagement

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Stewart Patrick, Shepard Forman
Lynne Rienner Publishers, 2002 - Political Science - 509 pages
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When should the United States cooperate with others in confronting global problems? Why is the U.S. often ambivalent about multilateral cooperation? What are the costs of acting alone? These are some of the timely questions addressed in this examination of the role of multilateralism in U.S. foreign policy. The authors isolate a number of factors that help to explain U.S. reluctance to commit to multilateral cooperation. They then analyze recent policy in specific areas - e.g., the use of force, peace-keeping, arms control, human rights, the United Nations, sanctions, international trade, environmental protection - probing the causes and consequences of U.S. decisions to act alone or opt out of multilateral initiatives. A concluding chapter underscores the point that increasingly pressing transnational problems may require the U.S. to reform its policymaking structures and to reconsider longstanding assumptions about national sovereignty and freedom of action.
 

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Contents

The United States International Organizations
47
The Growing Influence of Domestic Factors
75
Public Attitudes Toward Multilateralism
99
Multilateralism and U S Grand Strategy
121
A European Perspective
141
Unilateral Action in a Multilateral World
167
The Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty
225
The Chemical Weapons Convention
247
Unilateralism Multilateralism and
323
Why Is U S Human Rights Policy So Unilateralist?
345
Unilateralism Realism and TwoLevel Games
415
The Future of Multilateral Cooperation
435
List of Acronyms
461
The Contributors
491
About the Book
509
Copyright

The United States as Deadbeat?
267

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