Mushrooms: how to Grow Them: A Practical Treatise on Mushroom Culture for Profit and Pleasure

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Orange Judd Company, 1901 - Mushrooms - 161 pages
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Contents

I
9
II
15
III
34
IV
39
V
41
VI
54
VII
57
VIII
69
XII
100
XIII
103
XIV
107
XV
109
XVI
111
XVII
115
XVIII
120
XIX
122

IX
74
X
78
XI
96
XX
136
XXI
143
XXII
150

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Page 157 - ... as they are done. When all are prepared, take them from the water with the hands, to avoid the sediment, and put them into a stewpan with the fresh butter, white pepper, salt, and the juice...
Page 161 - ... them, and then another layer of mushrooms, and so on alternately. Let them remain for a few hours, when break them up with the hand; put them in a nice cool place for 3 days, occasionally stirring and mashing them well, to extract from them as much juice as possible. Now measure the quantity of liquor without straining, and to each quart allow the above proportion of spices, etc.

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