Music in the Collective Experience in Sixteenth-century Milan

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Ashgate Publishing, Ltd., 2005 - Music - 313 pages
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Renaissance music, like its sister arts, was most often experienced collectively. While it was possible to read Renaissance polyphony silently from a music manuscript or print, improvize alone, or perform as a soloist, the very practical nature of Renaissance music defied individualism. The reading and improvisation of polyphony was most frequently achieved through close co-operation, and this mutual endeavour extended beyond the musicians to include the society to which it is addressed. In sixteenth-century Milan, music, an art traditionally associated with the court and cathedral, came to be appropriated by the old nobility and the new aristocracy alike as a means of demonstrating social primacy and newly acquired wealth. As class mobility assumed greater significance in Milan and the size of the city expanded beyond its Medieval borders, music-making became ever more closely associated with public life.
 

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Contents

Music for the Battle of Pavia
1
From Ducal to Gubernatorial Ceremonial
31
The Civic Ceremonial at the Duomo of Milan
79
Music in the Civic Processions and Triumphal Progressions
123
Instrumental Music and Musicians under the Early Governors
157
The Collective Culture of Secular Song
195
Public Devotion in PostTridentine Milan
229
Appendix I
273
Appendix II
289
Bibliography
295
Index
307
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About the author (2005)

Christine Suzanne Getz is Assistant Professor at the Department of Music, University of Iowa, USA.

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