Music Therapy in Schools: Working with Children of All Ages in Mainstream and Special Education

Front Cover
Amelia Oldfield, Jo Tomlinson, Philippa Derrington
Jessica Kingsley Publishers, Sep 15, 2011 - Psychology - 256 pages

The majority of music therapy work with children takes place in schools. This book documents the wealth and diversity of work that music therapists are doing in educational settings across the UK. It shows how, in recent years, music therapy has changed and grown as a profession, and it provides an insight into the trends that are emerging in this area in the 21st century.

Collating the experiences of a range of music therapists from both mainstream and special education backgrounds, Music Therapy in Schools explains the procedures, challenges and benefits of using music therapy in an educational context. These music therapists have worked with children of all ages and abilities from pre-school toddlers in nursery schools to teenagers preparing for further education, and address specific issues and disabilities including working with children with emotional and behavioural problems, and autistic spectrum disorders.

This book will be essential reading for music therapists, music therapy students and educational professionals.

 

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Contents

Acknowledgements
12
Chapter 1 Setting up and Developing Music Therapy at a Childrens Centre for Preschool Children and their Families and Carers
18
Chapter 2 Open Doors Open Minds Open Music The Development of Music Therapy Provision in an Assessment Nursery
32
Supporting Music Therapy Students on Placement
46
Chapter 4 Multiple Views of Music Therapy
60
Combining the Roles of Music Therapist and Music Teacher
74
Working with Aggressive Behaviour in Children Aged Five to Nine Who Risk Mainstream School Exclusion
88
Investigating the Role of Imitation and Reflection in the Interaction between Music Therapist and Child
102
Working Jointly with Teaching Assistants
178
Chapter 13 Yeah Ill Do Music Working with Secondaryaged Students Who Have Complex Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties
194
Looking Back on the Development of a Service Personal Reflections of Three Heads of Service of Cambridgeshire Music
212
Questionnaire for Parents Feedback for Community Music Group
218
Interview Questions for Teachers
221
Assessment and Qualifications Alliance Unit Awards
222
References
228
The Contributors
236

The Development of One Aspect of a Communitybased Music Therapy Service in York and North Yorkshire
116
A Creative Response to Cumulative Trauma
132
Chapter 10 Music Therapy in a Special School for Children with Autistic Spectrum Disorder Focusing Particularly on the Use of the Double Bass
150
Chapter 11 How Can I Consider Letting My Child Go to School When I Spend All My Time Trying to Keep Him Alive? Links Between Music Thera...
164
Subject Index
242
Author Index
250
Copyright

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About the author (2011)

Amelia Oldfield is a well-known and prestigious music therapist with over 25 years' experience in the field. She works at the Croft Unit for Child and Family Psychiatry and at the Child Development Centre, Addenbrookes. She also lectures at Anglia Polytechnic University, where she co-initiated the MA Music Therapy Training. Amelia has completed four research investigations and a PhD. She has also produced six music therapy training videos. She is married with four children and plays clarinet in local chamber music groups in Cambridge, UK.

Jo Tomlinson has been working as a music therapist in schools in Cambridgeshire, UK, for over 15 years. She was involved in setting up the music therapy service for Cambridgeshire Music in 1995, and was head music therapist from 2001 – 2005.

Philippa Derrington has been working as a music therapist with young people in mainstream and special school settings in Cambridgeshire for the past 10 years. She is currently involved in a major research investigation evaluating the effects of music therapy for children at risk of exclusion.

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