Music for Sight Singing

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Prentice Hall, 2011 - Music - 422 pages
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For courses in Music Theory (a two-year sequence including sight singing and ear training) as well as separate Sight Singing courses.

Using an abundance of meticulously organized melodies drawn from the literature of composed music and a wide range of the world's folk music, Ottman provides the most engaging and comprehensive Sight Singing text on the market.

Over fifty years ago, Robert W. Ottman set out to write a book that draws examples from the literature as opposed to being composed by the author. He proposed that students should work with "real" music as they study musical forms. The result was Music for Sight Singing. Not only is real music more enjoyable and interesting to sing than dry examples, but genuine repertoire naturally introduces a host of important musical considerations beyond pitch and rhythm (including dynamics, accents, articulations, slurs, repeat signs, and tempo markings). Several generations of teachers have also agreed that Ottman's ability to order his examples from the simple to the complex is another key to the book's long term success. Nancy Rogers, the book's new author, has added new vitality to the book, introducing exercises to develop creativity as well as to build basic skills.

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About the author (2011)

NANCY ROGERS is an Associate Professor of Music Theory at Florida State University. With research interests including music cognition and its pedagogical implications, Dr. Rogers has presented papers at national and international conferences, including meetings of the Society for Music Theory, the Society for Music Perception and Cognition, the International Conference on Music Perception and Cognition, and the Conference on Interdisciplinary Musicology. She was a keynote speaker at the 2009 Musical Ear conference held at Indiana University. Several recent publications may be found in Music Theory Online, the Journal of Music Theory Pedagogy, and Em Pauta.

Professor Rogers received her Ph.D. in music theory from the Eastman School of Music; she is a Mellon Fellow in the Humanities. She has served as President of Music Theory Southeast, Secretary of the Society for Music Theory, and Treasurer of Music Theory Midwest. Before coming to Florida State University, she served on the faculties of Northwestern University, the University of Iowa, and Lawrence University.

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