Music in Western Civilization

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W. W. Norton & Company, 1997 - Music - 1107 pages
Lang's monumental history of music and musical culture has stood for the past half-century as the definitive work of its kind.
 

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Music in Western civilization

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Contents

Poetry Song and Instrumental Music
6
The Sociological Aspects of Music
12
The Last Phase of Classical Music
18
Comparison of the Music of Ancient Greece and Byzantium
24
ROME
31
THE PATRISTIC PERIOD
37
Theological Philosophical and Scientific Foundations of Christian Ritual
55
GREGORIAN ART AND ITS SPHERE OF INFLUENCE
62
English Music in the Late Baroque
515
Bach and Handel
526
The Rise of the Rococo from the Disintegrating Baroque
533
RousseauThe Buffoon War The Opéra Comique
547
New Aspects of Opera Seria and Tragédie Lyrique
553
Enlightened Absolutism
567
Music and the EnlightenmentThe Berlin School
574
The Relationship of Musical Theory and Practice
585

Gregorian Chant in the Universal Sacred Art of the Romanesque Period
77
Theoretical Artistic and Philosophical Conceptions of Music
84
Lyric Poetry Parody and Persiflage
96
The Awakening of Italian Lyricism by Provençal
112
THE GOTHIC
122
Forms and Devices of Early Polyphony
128
Romanesque and Gothic
136
THE ARS NOVA
144
The Ars Nova in France
152
The Practice of Trecento Music
158
Renaissance Music Vindicated by Modern Research
174
The Rise of a NeoGothic Style
183
Migration of Flemish Musicians
190
Reformation and RenaissanceHumanism in Germany
199
Burgundian and FrancoFlemish Influence in German
205
The Classical Netherlands Style and Its Internationalization
213
The Venetian School
219
The Final Synthesis of Polyphony
226
Palestrina
232
Instruments and Instrumental Music
239
German Music in the Late Renaissance
250
Spain and Its Music During the Renaissance
259
The Choral Composers of the HispanoFlemish School
265
Early Tudor Composers
272
The Elizabethan and Jacobean School
283
Aesthetic Doctrines of the Renaissance
292
Repercussions of HumanismTendency Toward the Lyric Stage
303
Music in the New World
311
Religious Thought as the Motive Power of Early Baroque
317
Romanticism in the BaroqueThe Theater
327
The Early Music Drama
334
Sacred OperaOratorioComic Opera
343
The New Technique of Composition and Performance
357
Principles and Types of Instrumental Music
364
Western Europe in the Early Seventeenth Century
372
The Fundamental Opposition of French Thought to Opera
383
The Musical Baroque in Germany
392
Early Baroque Opera in Germany
403
The Baroque in Other Countries
418
THE LATE BAROQUE
430
Johann Sebastian Bach
481
The Antecedents of the Preclassic Symphony
591
THE CLASSIC ERA
618
Haydn
624
Mozart
630
THE PERIPHERIES OF EIGHTEENTHCENTURY MUSIC
675
America
687
EighteenthCentury Conception of Vocal Music
695
EighteenthCentury Musical Practice
708
The Social Aspects of EighteenthCentury Music
719
Musical Criticism and Historiography
725
Failure of the Enlightenment to Produce an Art of the People
731
The Romantic Movement in Germany
740
Schubert
776
French Opera During Revolution Directoire and Empire
786
Early Romantic Opera in Germany
793
ROMANTICISM
801
MendelssohnSchumannChopin
809
Stylistic Criticism of Romantic Music
816
The Grand Opera
825
German Opera
839
The Search for the AllEmbracing Universal
846
Church Music and the New SymphonicDramatic Tendencies
853
Wagner
859
COUNTER CURRENTS
895
Century
916
France
923
England
929
Nationalism in Music
938
Scandinavia
958
NineteenthCentury Musical Thought
973
Musical Criticism
979
Musicology
985
Instrumental Music
992
Opera
998
Church Music
1006
The Decline of the West?
1023
Notes
1031
Bibliography
1045
Index
1067
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About the author (1997)

The late Paul Henry Lang ranks among the century's most eminent musicologists. A longtime faculty member at Columbia University, he also served as editor of the Musical Quarterly and as music critic for the New York Herald Tribune.

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