Music in Everyday Life

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Cambridge University Press, Jun 8, 2000 - Music - 181 pages
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The power of music to influence mood, create scenes, routines and occasions is widely recognised and this is reflected in a strand of social theory from Plato to Adorno that portrays music as an influence on character, social structure and action. There have, however, been few attempts to specify this power empirically and to provide theoretically grounded accounts of music's structuring properties in everyday experience. Music in Everyday Life uses a series of ethnographic studies - an aerobics class, karaoke evenings, music therapy sessions and the use of background music in the retail sector - as well as in-depth interviews to show how music is a constitutive feature of human agency. Drawing together concepts from psychology, sociology and socio-linguistics it develops a theory of music's active role in the construction of personal and social life and highlights the aesthetic dimension of social order and organisation in late modern societies.
 

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Contents

Formulating questions the music and society nexus
1
Musical affect in practice
21
Music as a technology of self
46
Music and the body
75
Music as a device of social ordering
109
Musics social powers
151
Bibliography
164
Index
177
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About the author (2000)

Tia DeNora is Head of Department and Reader in Sociology at the University of Exeter. She has published widely on music sociology. Her books include Beethoven and the Construction of Genius (1995) Music in Everyday Life (CUP 2000).

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