My Brilliant Career

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Filiquarian Publishing, LLC., 2006 - Literary Collections - 364 pages
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The fierce, irreverent novel of aspiration and rebellion that is both a cornerstone of Australian literature and a feminist classic Miles Franklin began the candid, passionate, and contrary My Brilliant Career when she was only sixteen, intending it to be the Australian answer to Jane Eyre. But the book she produceda thinly veiled autobiographical novel about a young girl hungering for life and love in the outbackso scandalized her country upon its appearance in 1901 that she insisted it not be published again until ten years after her death.
 

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User Review  - FutureMrsJoshGroban - LibraryThing

I cannot believe Miles Franklin was only 16 when she wrote this...WOW. I LOVED this book...to a point. I LOVED Sybylla...to a point. I guess I'm just too lousy a feminist to appreciate the ending. Ugh. Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

I Remember I Remember
9
An Introduction to Possum Gully
15
A Lifeless Life
19
A Career Which Soon Careered to an End
25
Disjointed Sketches and Crumbles
31
Revolt
41
Was Eer a Rose Without Its Thorn?
51
Possum Gully Left Behind Hurrah Hurrah
65
Same Yarn Continued
195
My Unladylike Behaviour Again
207
Sweet Seventeen
215
Ah for One Hour of Burning Love tis Worth an Age of Cold Respect
227
Thou Knowest Not What a Day May Bring Forth
239
Because?
245
Boast Not Thyself of Tomorrow
251
My Journey
263

Aunt Helens Recipe
79
Everard Grey
89
Yah
101
One Grand Passion
113
He
121
Principally Letters
135
When the Heart is Young
143
When Fortune Smiles
151
Idylls of Youth
163
As Short as I Wish Had Been the Majority of Sermons to Which I Have Been Forced to Give Ear
179
The 9th of November 1896
183
To Life
267
To Life Continued
277
Where Ignorance is Bliss tis Folly to be Wise
293
Mr Mswat and I Have a BustUp
301
TaTa to Barneys Gap
311
Back at Possum Gully
315
But Absent Friends Are Soon Forgot
321
The 3rd of December 1898
331
Once Upon a Time When the Days Were Long and Hot
339
He that Despiseth Little Things Shall Fall Little by Little
353
A Tale that is told and a Day that is done
359

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Page 8 - There is no plot in this story, because there has been none in my life or in any other life which has come under my notice.
Page 7 - MY DEAR FELLOW AUSTRALIANS, Just a few lines to tell you that this story is all about myself— for no other purpose do I write it.

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About the author (2006)

Miles Franklin was born and reared on farms in remote parts of New South Wales. These early experiences of a family struggling against an inhospitable land served as the basis for her first and best-known novel, My Brilliant Career (1901). The story of Sybylla Melvyn and her fantastic adventures in colonial Australia was made into a successful film, which brought about a revival of interest in Franklin and her long-forgotten novel; the interest, however, has been directed more toward her feminism than her literary work. Immediately after My Brilliant Career, Franklin wrote My Career Goes Bung (1946), which follows Sybylla's experiences as a successful author. Both of these novels foretell Franklin's lifelong revolt against the roles open to women. Through her literary and feminist contacts after the success of My Brilliant Career, Franklin found work as a freelance writer in Sydney before going to the United States in 1905, where she remained for nine years. In Chicago, she engaged in social work and suffragist activity for the National Women's Trade Union League. In 1927, she returned permanently to Australia, where she continued to write. Under the pseudonym "Brent of Bin Bin," she published six novels depicting Australian bush life, but they were never particularly successful. It has been pointed out that by the 1930s Australian fiction was changing, taking up new topics and moving away from realistic accounts of colonial life. Franklin's tireless promotion of Australian writing through her criticism and active involvement in literary circles, along with her feminist activities, make her an important figure in Australian literature, even though much of her work is of more historical significance than literary. Following her death in 1954, the Miles Franklin Award for Fiction was instituted to be given to a novelist whose work authentically represents Australian life.

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