My Début as a Literary Person and Other Essays

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American Publishing Company, 1903 - 357 pages
 

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Contents

I
5
II
42
III
66
IV
139
V
151
VI
180
VII
198
VIII
210
IX
226
X
240
XI
249
XII
254
XIII
270
XIV
287
Copyright

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Page 33 - From lightning and tempest; from plague, pestilence, and famine; from battle and murder, and from sudden death, , Good Lord, deliver us.
Page 309 - Nature for the wingless wild things that have their homes in the tree-tops and would visit together; the larch and the pomegranate flung their purple and yellow flames in brilliant broad splashes along the slanting sweep of the woodland; the sensuous fragrance of innumerable deciduous flowers rose upon the swooning atmosphere; far in the empty sky a solitary esophagus * slept upon motionless wing ; everywhere brooded stillness, serenity, and the peace of God.
Page 119 - Oh, bless God, we are saved! — he has lost ours — I wouldn't give this for a hundred of those sacks!
Page 120 - Order! I now offer the stranger's remaining document. It says: 'If no claimant shall appear [grand chorus of groans], I desire that you open the sack and count out the money to the principal citizens of your town, they to take it in trust [Cries of "Oh! Oh!
Page 136 - We thought it best that the checks—" "You will never see them again — they are destroyed. They came from Satan. I saw the hellbrand on them, and I knew they were sent to betray me to sin." Then he fell to gabbling strange and dreadful things which were not clearly understandable, and which the doctor admonished them to keep to themselves. Richards was right; the checks were never seen again. A nurse must have talked in her sleep, for within two days the forbidden gabblings were the property of...
Page 306 - It was a crisp and spicy morning in early October. The lilacs and laburnums, lit with the glory-fires of autumn, hung burning and flashing in the upper air, a fairy bridge provided by kind nature for the wingless wild things that have their home in the...
Page 96 - An architect and builder from the next State had lately ventured to set up a small business in this unpromising village, and his sign had now been hanging out a week. Not a customer yet; he was a discouraged man, and sorry he had come. But his weather changed suddenly now. First one and then another chief citizen's wife said to him privately: "Come to my house Monday week— but say nothing about it for the present. We think of building.
Page 83 - The pallet was made, and Mary said: "The open sesame — what could it have been? I do wonder what that remark could have been ? But come; we will get to bed now.
Page 308 - Far in the empty sky a solitary oesophagus slept upon motionless wing." It is not often I get a chance to read much periodical literature, but I have just gone through at this belated period, with much gratification and edification, your " Double-Barreled Detective Story." But what in hell is an oesophagus?
Page 111 - That's it! That's it! Come forward, Wilson!" THE HATTER "I move three cheers for Mr. Wilson, Symbol of the special virtue which—" The cheers burst forth before he could finish; and in the midst of them— and in the midst of the clamor of the gavel...

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