My Life as an Indian: The Story of a Red Woman and a White Man in the Lodges of the Blackfeet

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Doubleday, Page, 1907 - Indians of North America - 424 pages
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User Review  - MrsLee - LibraryThing

This is without question the best book of its type which I have ever read. It is the memoir of a man who set out for the western plains and Rockies during the 1870s. He worked with a trader and so was ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - jlsewell - LibraryThing

Schultz was an amazing man. What a life! He left his comfortable home and certain future in the East to find adventure in the untamed Western territory. He lived with the Blackfeet Indians for years ... Read full review

Contents

I
3
II
18
III
36
IV
47
V
59
VI
66
VII
79
VIII
89
XX
239
XXI
247
XXII
256
XXIII
267
XXIV
272
XXV
279
XXVI
288
XXVII
302

IX
97
X
105
XI
116
XII
134
XIII
142
XIV
152
XV
157
XVI
170
XVII
188
XVIII
206
XIX
222
XXVIII
319
XXIX
335
XXX
348
XXXI
355
XXXII
366
XXXIII
376
XXXIV
386
XXXV
394
XXXVI
403
XXXVII
411
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Page 41 - ... lodges. Bear's Head, frantically waving a paper which bore testimony to his good character and friendliness to the white men, ran toward the command On the bluff, shouting to them to cease firing, entreating them to save the women and children ; down he also went with several bullet holes in his body. Of the more than four hundred souls in camp at the time, very few escaped. And when it was all over, when the last wounded woman and child had been put out of misery, the soldiers piled the corpses...
Page 46 - bound to the wheel," and there is no escape from it except by death. And this is civilization ! I, for one, maintain that there is no satisfaction, no happiness in it. The Indians of the plains back in those days of which I write, alone knew what was perfect content and happiness, and that, we are told, is the chief end and aim of men — to be free from want and worry and care. Civilization will never furnish it except to the very, very few.
Page 152 - Obviously Larpenteur was writing of no ordinary individual. He was describing an important headman or chief. Schultz wrote of the horses of the Piegan in the late 1870's: "Horses were the tribal wealth, and one who owned a large herd of them held a position only to be compared to that of our multi-millionaires. There were individuals who owned from one hundred to three and four hundred."10 The memories of our informants go back to the period of which Schultz wrote. Some of the older men remember...
Page 382 - these people of mine are just as were the children of Israel, a persecuted race deprived of their heritage. But I will redress their wrongs; I will wrest justice for them from the tyrant. I will be unto them a second David.
Page 42 - How could they have done it?' I asked myself, time and time again. ' What manner of men were these soldiers who deliberately shot down defenseless women and innocent children? ' They had not even the excuse of being drunk; nor was their commanding officer intoxicated; nor were they excited or in any danger whatever. Deliberately, coolly, with steady and deadly aim they shot them down, killed the wounded, and then tried to burn the bodies of their victims. But I will say no more about it. Think it...
Page 46 - ... the Piegan Blackfeet. How truly and deeply enamored of that life he became is revealed in his lament that it is past: " Alas ! Alas! " he says; " why could not this simple life have continued ? Why must the railroads, and the swarms of settlers have invaded that wonderful land, and robbed its lords of all that made life worth living ? They knew not care, nor hunger, nor want of any kind. From my window here I hear the roar of the great city, and see the crowds hurrying by. The day is bitterly...
Page 64 - I have often heard and read that Indian women received no consideration from their husbands, and led a life of exceedingly hard and thankless work. That is very wide of the truth so far as the natives of the northern plains were concerned. It is true, that the women gathered fuel for the lodge — bundles of dry willow, or limbs from a fallen cottonwood. They also did the cooking, and besides tanning robes, converted the skins of deer, elk, antelope, and mountain sheep into soft buckskin for family...
Page 41 - Of th& more than 400 souls in camp at the time, very few escaped. And when it was all over, when the last wounded woman and child had been put out of misery, the soldiers piled the corpses on overturned lodges, firewood, and household property and set fire to it all. " ' Several years afterward I was on the ground. Everywhere scattered about In the long grass and brush, just where the wolves and foxes had left them* gleamed the skulls and bones of those who had been so ruthlessly slaughtered. "Hew...
Page 103 - It is well for the Indians to do this," she went on, "but not for a white man. You, you are rich; you have everything you want; those papers, that yellow hard rock (gold) you carry will buy anything you want; you should be ashamed to go sneaking over the plains like a coyote. None of your people ever did that.
Page vii - Such an intimate revelation of the domestic life of the Indians has never before been written. The sympathetic insight everywhere evident is everywhere convincing. We feel that the men and the women portrayed are men and women of actual living existence.

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