My Lord, what a Morning: An Autobiography

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University of Illinois Press, 2002 - Biography & Autobiography - 319 pages
3 Reviews
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My Lord, What a Morning is a gentle and engrossing memoir, abounding with the tender and inspiring stories of Marian Anderson's life in her own modest words. From her humble but proud beginnings in south Philadelphia to international vocal renown, the legendary contralto writes of triumph and adversity, of being grounded in faith and surrounded by family, and of the music that shaped her career.
Anderson published My Lord, What a Morning in 1956 on the heels of her groundbreaking role as the first African American to perform at the Metropolitan Opera. In it are bittersweet reminiscences of a working-class childhood, from her first job scrubbing the neighbors' steps to the sorrow and upheaval of her father's untimely death. Here are the stories of a young girl with prodigious talent, and her warm remembrances of the teachers, managers, friends, accompanists, and fans who worked to foster it. Here is a veritable travelogue of her concerts across the globe and rare glimpses at the personal life of a woman more concerned with family than celebrity.
An entire chapter devoted to the Easter concert at the Lincoln Memorial in 1939 reveals Anderson's immense respect for Eleanor Roosevelt, who resigned from the Daughters of the American Revolution when they refused to let Anderson perform at Constitution Hall. Supplanting sorrow and regret for anger and violence, Anderson demurely imparts her views on discrimination and on becoming an icon in the struggle for civil rights.
With eleven photographs and a touching new foreword by Anderson's nephew, famed conductor and poet James DePreist, this new paperback edition of My Lord, What a Morning revives the classic portrait of a musical legend who was resilient in the bullying face of bigotry and gracious in the unfaltering glow of fame.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - CasaBooks - LibraryThing

My Lord, What a Woman! Published in 1956. Difficult to remember just how segregated the south, our country, the world was at that time. Immense admiration for this artist who conducted herself without ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - cammykitty - LibraryThing

I'm a little conflicted about writing a review of Marian Anderson's My Lord, What a Morning. I feel like I should give it five stars just because it contains words written by a beautiful person who ... Read full review

Contents

Philadelphia Childhood
3
Life at Grandmothers
16
Branching Out
25
Shock
37
Learning How
46
Up andWay Down
62
A Home of Our Own
75
Mother
89
Easter Sunday
184
Songs I Sing
197
Notes on the Voice
207
On the Road
217
Good Companions
228
The Highest and the Lowest
239
East and West
253
Those Who Listen
263

Contest
100
Step Up
108
First Trip to Europe 18
118
Scandinavia
141
Beyond Scandinavia
151
Home Again
160
Russia
174
Recordings
278
Husband and Home
284
At the Metropolitan
293
Looking Forward
306
Index
313
Copyright

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About the author (2002)

Marian Anderson (1897-1993) was an internationally renowned contralto and an icon in the civil rights movement. James DePreist (1936-2013) was Music Director of the Oregon Symphony and regularly performed with the Philadelphia Orchestra, the Chicago Symphony, and the New York Philharmonic. He was a recipient of the National Medal of Arts and authored two collections of poetry.

Bibliographic information