My Maasai Life: From Suburbia to Savannah

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Greystone Books, Jul 1, 2010 - Biography & Autobiography - 300 pages
2 Reviews
Growing up in suburban Illinois, Robin Wiszowaty leads a typical middle-class American life. Hers is a world of gleaming shopping malls, congested freeways, and neighborhood gossip. But from an early age, she has longed to break free of this existence and discover something deeper. What it is, she doesn't quite know. Yet she knows in her heart there simply has to be more.

Through a fortunate twist of fate, Robin seizes an opportunity to travel to rural Kenya and join an impoverished Maasai community. Suddenly her days are spent hauling water, evading giraffes, and living in a tiny hut made of cow dung with her adoptive family. She is forced to face issues she's never considered: extreme poverty, drought, female circumcision, corruption — and discovers love in the most unexpected places. In the open wilds of the dusty savannah, this Maasai life is one she could never have imagined.

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User Review  - mmeharvey - LibraryThing

I believe I was this first to borrow this book since we added it to our collection last year but it was a great read. It tells the story of an American college student who lives with a Maasai tribe in ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - knittingmomof3 - LibraryThing

From my book review blog Rundpinne. "After high school and during college it is not uncommon for one to question what one wants out of life, however, rarely does one hear a student declare they are ... Read full review

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About the author (2010)

Born in Schaumberg, Illinois, Robin Wiszowaty currently resides in her adoptive home of Kenya. With a lifetime of volunteerism and education research behind her, she serves as Free The Children's Kenya Program Director, overseeing development projects throughout the country.

In 2002, she spent a year living with the Maasai people, immersing herself in their culture and communicating solely in Swahili. Her explorations into poverty and seeking its solutions took her to sites throughout East Africa. My Maasai Life is her chronicle of these experiences, and beyond.

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