My Other Women

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The Porcupine's Quill, 2010 - Fiction - 198 pages
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In My Other Women, Pauline Carey takes a sidelong, sardonic look at the institution of marriage through the eyes of a young woman who wants no part of it. Andrea Dermot is a gifted, determined young actress who creates a life and career for herself in the wave of theatrical innovation that erupted in Toronto in the 1960s. Believing that an artist with ambition must guard her independence, Andrea chooses to avoid marriage, but she can't ignore love: the arrival of the contraceptive pill in Canada, nudity on Toronto stages and Betty Friedan's The Feminine Mystique on best-seller lists all pointed to an age of revolutionary freedom for women, men and Canadian theatre.

There are intriguing parallels between Andrea's exploration of her work in the theatre and exploration of her sexuality. The three main loves of Andrea's life are three married men, each of whom works in the arts. And three times, after the love affairs end, Andrea finds a friend and co-worker in her ex-lover's wife. (Do the wives know? Perhaps.) The examination of love and friendship in My Other Women adds a deeper emotional colour and truth to the story, while Carey's portrait of a time of rebellion and change is sharp, insightful and entertaining.
 

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Contents

Section 1
7
Section 2
11
Section 3
21
Section 4
26
Section 5
32
Section 6
38
Section 7
44
Section 8
51
Section 18
117
Section 19
125
Section 20
131
Section 21
139
Section 22
146
Section 23
155
Section 24
159
Section 25
167

Section 9
56
Section 10
62
Section 11
67
Section 12
76
Section 13
85
Section 14
91
Section 15
96
Section 16
102
Section 17
109
Section 26
172
Section 27
175
Section 28
182
Section 29
185
Section 30
189
Section 31
192
Section 32
201
Section 33
203
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

As an actor, Pauline Carey played the god in Toronto in Dionysus in 69 and in 1980 toured Canada as Charlotte Bronté in Graham Jackson's solo play, Charlotte. As a playwright, her children's variety show Bugs has run in two theatre festivals, a contemporary play, My Name is Emma, won an award in Wales in 2005 and in 2006 she was named a finalist in the BC National Playwriting Competition for her play about Mary Wollstonecraft and William Godwin, Reason Has Nothi

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