My Brother, Theodore Roosevelt

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C. Scribner's Sons, 1921 - Biography - 365 pages
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Page 283 - For the time will come when they will not endure sound doctrine ; but after their own lusts shall they heap to themselves teachers, having itching ears ; And they shall turn away their ears from the truth, and shall be turned unto fables.
Page 356 - Lusitania, nothing should be done in the spirit of mere vengeance. Then let us agree to extend the privileges of the League, as rapidly as their conduct warrants it, to other nations, doubtless discriminating between those who would have a guiding part in the League and the weak nations who would be entitled to the privileges of membership, but who would not be entitled to a guiding voice in the councils. Let each nation reserve to itself and for its own decision, and let it clearly set forth questions...
Page 293 - One of our great poets has well and finely said that freedom is not a gift that tarries long in the hands of cowards.
Page 356 - Would it not be well to begin with the league which we actually have in existence, the league of the allies who have fought through this great war? Let us at the peace table see that real justice is done as among these allies, and that while the sternest reparation is demanded from our foes...
Page 102 - FORSAKEN GARDEN IN a coign of the cliff between lowland and highland, At the sea-down's edge between windward and lee, Walled round with rocks as an inland island, The ghost of a garden fronts the sea. A girdle of brushwood and thorn encloses The steep square slope of the blossomless bed Where the weeds that grew green from the graves of its roses Now lie dead.
Page 299 - I suggest that my conditional refusal to run be placed in the hands of the Progressive National Committee. If Mr. Hughes's statements, when he makes them, shall satisfy the committee that it is for the interest of the country that he be elected, they can act accordingly and treat my refusal as definitely accepted. If they are not satisfied, they can so notify the Progressive party, and at the same time they can confer with me, and then determine on whatever action we may severally deem appropriate...
Page 293 - Cowardice in a race, as in an individual, is the unpardonable sin, and a wilful failure to prepare for danger may in its effects be as bad as cowardice. The timid man who cannot fight, and the selfish, shortsighted, or foolish man who will not take the steps that will enable him to fight, stand on almost the same plane.
Page 50 - Theodore, you have the mind but you have not the body, and without the help of the body the mind cannot go as far as it should. You must make your body. It is hard drudgery to make one's body, but I know you will do it.
Page 356 - Allies, and that while the sternest reparation is demanded from our foe for such horrors as those, committed in Belgium, Northern France, Armenia, and the sinking of the Lusitania, nothing should be done in the spirit of mere vengeance. Then let us agree to extend the privileges of the league as rapidly as their conduct warrants it to other nations...
Page 126 - I am by inheritance and by education a Republican; whatever good I have been able to accomplish in public life has been accomplished through the Republican party ; I have acted with it in the past, and wish to act with it in the future...

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