My recollection of Chicago ; and, The doctrine of laissez faire

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University of Toronto Press, Jul 20, 1998 - Biography & Autobiography - 126 pages
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Disillusioned by the General Drudgery of his Job, Stephen Leacock resigned from his teaching position at Upper Canada College in 1899 to pursue graduate studies. 'At Chicago, ' Leacock wrote wryly, 'they made a genial pretense that I was fit for the graduate school in economics. It is a little hard to see why, except that I was obviously not fit to die.'Leacock graduated from the university in 1903. His dissertation, until now, was thought to be lost. Carl Spadoni's discovery of this thesis -- unread since its defense -- gives readers a unique opportunity to re-examine Leacock's philosophies. 'The Doctrine of Laissez Faire' reveals the early roots of his scepticism about political economy on which his later works of humour fed. In it, Leacock attempts to demystify the dogmatic opposition to state intervention based on this economic precept.In his introduction, Spadoni provides the historical background for an intellectual understanding of Leacock's thesis. The first part of this book is a short essay by Leacock in which he reminisces on his graduate years at Chicago. The second part consists of his newly unearthed thesis. Togeth

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Contents

editors introduction
vii
EDITORIAL NOTE
xli
15
15
Copyright

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About the author (1998)

Born in Swanmore, England, Stephen Leacock was one of 11 children of an unsuccessful farmer and an ambitious mother, a woman to whom Leacock no doubt owed his energetic and status-conscious nature. In 1891, while teaching at the prestigious Upper Canada College in Toronto, Leacock obtained a modern language degree from the University of Toronto. In 1903, after receiving a Ph.D. in political economy from the University of Chicago, he joined the staff of McGill University, Montreal, as professor of politics and economics. Leacock's career as a humorist began when he had some comic pieces published as Literary Lapses in 1910. This successful book was followed by two more books of comic sketches, Nonsense Novels (1911) and Sunshine Sketches of a Little Town (1912), which is now considered his best book. Leacock continued this frantic literary output for the remainder of his career, producing more than 30 books of humor as well as biographies and social commentaries. The Stephen Leacock Medal for Humour was established after his death to honor annually an outstanding Canadian humorist.

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