Nabokov’s Cinematic Afterlife

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McFarland, Nov 23, 2010 - Performing Arts - 243 pages
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This book offers critical studies of films that adapted works by Vladimir Nabokov. One of the most screened twentieth century authors (with over ten books adapted for cinema), his works are full of quirky and forbidden romance, and his writing is renowned for its cinematic qualities (e.g., frames, stage directions, and descriptions suggesting specific camera positions and movements). Films discussed include Lolita (both Kubrick’s 1962 and Lyne’s 1997 versions), Richardson’s Laughter in the Dark (1969), Skolimowski’s King, Queen, Knave (1972), Fassbinder’s Despair (1978), Foulon’s Mademoiselle O (1994), Kuik’s An Affair of Honor (1999), Gorris’ The Luzhin Defence (2000), and Rohmer’s The Triple Agent (2004). A final chapter discusses similarities between Nabokov and Jean-Luc Godard.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
1 Humbert Between Dignity and Romanticism
13
2 Going Blind in Swinging London
51
3 Nabokov or the Logic of Late Capitalism
70
4 Escape into a Different Person Escape into a Different Reality
87
5 Remembrance of Things Unspoken
104
6 Duel in Contemporary Estonia
125
7 Nabokov as a Gentle Feminist
143
8 From BMovie Script to Greek Tragedy
163
9 Vladimir Nabokov and JeanLuc Godard
181
Appendix
211
Chapter Notes
215
Works Cited
219
Index
229
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About the author (2010)

Ewa Mazierska is a professor of comtemporary cinema in the School of Journalism, Media and Communication, at the University of Central Lancashire in the UK. She has published numerous articles on various aspects of European cinema.

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