Nadine Gordimer

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Nov 10, 1994 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 221 pages
1 Review
The award to Nadine Gordimer of the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1991 was an affirmation of her distinctive contribution to twentieth-century fiction and to the creation of a literature that challenges apartheid. In this study, which may be used as an introduction as well as by those already familiar with Gordimer's work, Dominic Head discusses each of her novels in detail, paying close attention to the texts both as a reflection of events and situations in the real world, and as evidence of her constant rethinking of her craft. Head shows how Gordimer's concerns, apparent in her earliest novels, are developed through increasing stress on the politics of textuality; and he pursues the implications of this development to consider how Gordimer's later work contributes to postmodernist fiction, and to a recentering of political engagement in an era of uncertainty.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

IV
1
V
34
VI
77
VII
136
VIII
161
IX
182
X
194
XI
207
XII
219
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1994)

Kathleen Newland is cofounder of the Migration Policy Institute and directs MPI's programs on Migrants, Migration, and Development and Refugee Protection. Previously, she was a senior associate and codirector of the International Migration Policy program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. Karen D. Turner is a career minister and director of the Office of Development Partners at the U.S. Agency for International Development.