Nana

Front Cover
Oxford University Press, 1998 - Fiction - 430 pages
21 Reviews
Nana opens in 1867, the year of the World Fair, when Paris, thronged by a cosmopolitan elite, was a perfect target for Zola's scathing denunciation of hypocrisy and fin-de-siècle moral corruption. In this new translation, the fate of Nana--the Helen of Troy of the second Empire, and daughter of the laundress in L'Assommoir--is now rendered in racy, stylish English.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Smiler69 - LibraryThing

Nana is the ninth installment in the 20-volume Les Rougon-Macquart series, which I undertook to read in publication order a couple of years ago. In some ways, my appreciation for this novel has grown ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Miguelnunonave - LibraryThing

The story of a high-class courtesan, written with great humour and detail. The archetypal men destroyer. Zola is a master of social realism. It probably caused a stir in its time, though it feels quite inocuous nowadays. Read full review

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About the author (1998)

Douglas Parmee is a retired Fellow of Queens' College, Cambridge. He now lives in Adelaide, South Australia.

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