Nana

Front Cover
OUP Oxford, Jan 29, 2009 - Fiction - 464 pages
18 Reviews
Nana opens in 1867, the year of the World Fair, when Paris, thronged by a cosmopolitan --eacute--;lite, was la Ville Lumi--egrave--;re, a perfect victim for Zola's scathing denunciation of hypocrisy and fin-de-si--egrave--;cle moral corruption. The fate of Nana, the Helen of Troy of the Second Empire, and daughter of the laundress in L'Assommoir, reduced Flaubert to almost inarticulate gasps of admiration: `Chapter 14, unsurpassable! ... Yes! ... Christ Almighty! ... Incomparable ... Straight out of Babylon!' Boulevard society is presented with painstaking attention to detail, and Zola's documentation of the contemporary theatrical scene comes directly from his own experience - it was his own failure as a playwright which sent him back to novel-writing and Nana itself. novel-writing and Nana itself. This new translation is an accurate and stylish rendering of Zola's original, which was first published in 1880.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Smiler69 - LibraryThing

Nana is the ninth installment in the 20-volume Les Rougon-Macquart series, which I undertook to read in publication order a couple of years ago. In some ways, my appreciation for this novel has grown ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Miguelnunonave - LibraryThing

The story of a high-class courtesan, written with great humour and detail. The archetypal men destroyer. Zola is a master of social realism. It probably caused a stir in its time, though it feels quite inocuous nowadays. Read full review

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