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Penguin Books Limited, Jul 26, 1973 - Fiction - 480 pages
22 Reviews
Born to drunken parents in the slums of Paris, Nana lives in squalor until she is discovered at the Théâtre des Variétés. She soon rises from the streets to set the city alight as the most famous high-class prostitute of her day. Rich men, Comtes and Marquises fall at her feet, great ladies try to emulate her appearance, lovers even kill themselves for her. Nana's hedonistic appetite for luxury and decadent pleasures knows no bounds - until, eventually, it consumes her. Nana provoked outrage on its publication in 1880, with its heroine damned as 'the most crude and bestial sort of whore', yes the language of the novel makes Nana almost a mythical figure: a destructive force preying on a corrupt society.

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User Review  - DeltaQueen50 - LibraryThing

Nana by Emile Zola was written 1880 and vividly captures the lively theatre society of Paris and the life of courtesan Nana Coupeau. Nana has risen to a high class prostitute through her role as the ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - arubabookwoman - LibraryThing

This magnificent novel is the story of the rise, fall, and rise again of Nana (child of Gervais of L'Assommoir) from streetwalker to queen of Parisian society in the late 1860's. It opens with Nana's ... Read full review

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About the author (1973)

Emile Zola (1840-1902) was the leading figure in the French school of naturalistic fiction. His principal work, Les Rougon-Macquart, is a panorama of mid-19th century French life, in a cycle of 20 novels which Zola wrote over a period of 22 years. George Holden is a known translator.

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