Narcissus Scrap-book: Containing an Account of the Seizure of a Nude Statuette by the City Marshal of New Bedford : the Trial of the Owner, His Suit Against the Marshal, and Comments of the Press

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Charles Hazeltine
Anthony & Sons, 1873 - Arts and morals - 60 pages
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Page 41 - with envy ; scarce confesses That his blood flows, or that his appetite Is more to bread than stone : hence shall we see, If power change purpose, what our seemers be.
Page 58 - Immodest words admit of no defence; For want of decency is want of sense.
Page 15 - Commonwealth, providing for the punishment of any person having in his possession for the purpose of sale or...
Page 32 - Universe from their several stations, there was nothing in the Heavens above, or the earth beneath, or the waters under the earth...
Page 64 - BOOK IS NOT RETURNED TO THE LIBRARY ON OR BEFORE THE LAST DATE STAMPED BELOW. NON-RECEIPT OF OVERDUE NOTICES DOES NOT EXEMPT THE BORROWER FROM OVERDUE FEES. ••> FINE ARTS LIBRARY 3 2044...
Page 17 - ... emotions in which the sensual elements are largely commingled, with of course the debasing effects correspondingly increased as the object declines in the scale of decency. Certainly with such a system of education as this, the morals of youth should not be deprived of any of the safeguards of which they have hitherto had the benefit; and if the knowledge and love of high art cannot be...
Page 57 - ... public street is another thing. Are the gentlemen of the jury willing -that such images should be exhibited in the villages where they reside? At this very term of the court, a drunken wretch was sentenced to the House of Correction for an indecent exhibition of himself, and is art superior to nature ? Can a man carve such things in wood or marble or plaster, and be allowed to exhibit them in the name of art ? What must have been the effect on the young, of the view of this image? Was it elevating...
Page 13 - The rights of properly are sacred, and the stock in trade of the meanest rumseller, keeping a liquor nuisance of magnificent proportions, and through whose acts indirectly every crime in the calendar is committed, cannot be seized without a warrant. Mr. Barney said that the demurrer, not denying that the statuette is obscene, virtually admits it for the purpose of this trial.
Page 56 - Willcox said he proposed to discuss the question whether Mr. Hazeltine's exhibition of the image was with criminal intent. Is the image obscene, and does it manifestly tend to corrupt the morals of youth?

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