Narrative of Sojourner Truth

Front Cover
Margaret Washington
Vintage Books, 1993 - Biography & Autobiography - 138 pages
Narrative of Sojourner Truth is one of the most important documents of slavery ever written, as well as being a partial autobiography of the woman who became a pioneer in the struggles for racial and sexual equality. With an eloquence that resonates more than a century after its original publication in 1850, the narrative bears witness to Sojourner Truth's thirty years of bondage in upstate New York and to the mystical revelations that turned her into a passionate and indefatigable abolitionist.

In this new edition, which has been edited and extensively annotated by the distinguished scholar and biographer of Sojourner Truth, Margaret Washington, Truth's testimony takes on added dimensions: as a lens into the little-known world of northern slavery; as a chronicle of spiritual conversion; and as an inspiring account of a black woman striving for personal and political empowerment.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Calavari - LibraryThing

While I had learned her name in history class, I never really knew the story of Sojourner Truth. I had even heard of and listened to a recounting of her most famous speech, "Ain't I a woman?" But I ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - HistReader - LibraryThing

Surely a classic, but not in the Shakespearean sense. It is a unique look into the life of one of millions of American slaves; never to discount her story or trials and tribulations, hers and any ... Read full review

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1993)

Washington of Cornell University

Sojourner Truth, born into slavery in the late 1790s as Isabella Baumfree, was the first African-American woman to win a court case when she reclaimed her son from the man who sold him back into slavery after his emancipation. After changing her name, Truth travelled as a Methodist preacher and spoke out regularly on behalf of the abolitionist cause. In 1851, at the Ohio's Women Rights Convention, Truth delivered her most well-known speech "Ain't I a Woman?" During her lifetime, Truth spoke out about many causes, including women's suffrage, prison reform, property rights for former slaves, and she encouraged African-Americans to enlist in the Union Army. Her activism led her to make connections with many of her contemporary abolitionists such as Harriet Beecher Stowe and Frances Gage. In 1850, Truth's dictated her memoir, The Narrative of Sojourner Truth, to her friend Olive Gilbert and the title was soon met with acclaim by abolitionist readers and supporters. Truth died in 1883 and was buried alongside her family in Battle Creek, Michigan.

Bibliographic information